Sleep apnoea: Ramm family's bedtime nightmare

Kylie and Michael Ramm haven't shared a bed for the past eight months. During the night, their daughter Phyllisity needs to be brought back to life at least once a week.

Phyllisity suffers from obstructive sleep apnoea, which causes throat to relax and narrow while she sleeps, blocking her airway and stopping her breathing. The couple have put a strict rota system in place so that one of them is awake around the clock to watch Phyllisity. The parents want a machine that would aid her breathing - but so far doctors haven't provided one.

We discover what life is really like for Kylie, Michael and Phyllisity, and ask whether medical breakthroughs could offer hope for the future.

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Bank holiday BBQ safety tips

As the last barbecuing weekend of the summer approaches, new research has revealed many Brits make risky hygiene mistakes.

It found 19% of cooks do not keep raw and cooked food on separate plates, 21% do not wash their hands with soap after handling raw meat, and almost half (47%) do not keep food chilled until just before use.

With food poisoning cases doubling over the summer months, we share the dos and don'ts of barbecuing.

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Breastfeed 'to avoid postnatal depression'

New research suggests breastfeeding makes postnatal depression less likely

Mothers who breastfeed are less likely to develop postnatal depression, a new study has found. The survey of the mothers of almost 14,000 babies discovered that women who planned to breastfeed, and went on to, were 50% less likely to become depressed than mothers who didn't.

Women who planned to breastfeed, but couldn't, were at the highest risk of postpartum depression, according to the research published in the journal Maternal and Child Health.

Read more on this story with ITV News

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Cancer survival in England a 'postcode lottery'

There is an "inexcusable" postcode lottery of cancer care in England, a charity said, as it named and shamed the areas with the lowest survival rates.

Macmillan Cancer Support has released data which shows that in the worst-performing regions four in ten cancer patients died within 12 months of diagnosis.

In contrast, in the best performing local health area - north east Hampshire and Farnham - 24% of patients died within a year.

Chemists play a 'vital role' in the community

Local chemists could play a vital role in tackling major public health concerns such as obesity and smoking because the vast majority of people in England live within easy walking distance of one, a report has found. The National Pharmacy Association said:

  • 1.6 million people visit pharmacies every day
  • Nearly 90% of the population live within walking distance of one
  • It's claimed that five million GP visits could be managed in a pharmacy

Researchers at Durham University have found that chemists exist in all communities meaning that their expertise is available to everyone, and they are now calling on the Government to enable community pharmacies to provide more services to help tackle major public health concerns such as obesity, smoking and alcohol.

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'It's not always easy to go to someone'

The first thing we've got to do - and it's a big, big job - is change the culture which means managers don't want to hear something bad and [instead] get something done.

– Sir Robert Francis, chair of whistleblowing review

Speaking out about poor practices where you work can be a frightening experience, but staff in the NHS are being encouraged to do just that. Whistleblowing, as it's called -- can be the first step towards putting things right, and those who've done it are being asked to share their experiences with an independent review -- to help others uncover poor patient care.

Sir Robert Francis who is in charge of the review into how whistleblowers are treated in the NHS joined us this morning.

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Can aspirin cure cancer?

Doctors believe that taking aspirin over along period can dramatically the chances of getting some of the most serious cancers. Research published in a leading medical journal says taking small amounts of the pill for ten years cut bowel cancer cases by around 35% and deaths by 40%.

Rates of oesophageal and stomach cancers were cut by 30% and deaths from these cancers by 35-50%. The researchers admit that taking aspirin does increase the chances of getting stomach bleeding, but they say the benefits outweigh the risks.

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