Susanna gets her blood pressure checked...

Millions of adults are living with the so-called "silent killer" of undiagnosed high blood pressure.

Dr Hilary joined us to tell us why it's so important to get it checked, in which cases it should be higher or lower.

He also took a reading of Susanna's blood pressure, and, unsurprisingly, it was a little high!

Yours would be too if you had to sit next to Piers Morgan...

If you have high blood pressure reducing your salt intake and normalising your weight can help

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Ann Widdecombe: Women's march was 'pathetic'

Former MP Ann Widdecombe joined us on the sofa to share her experience as a farmer on the new series of Sugar Free Farm. Plus, Ann couldn't leave without sharing her strong views on Donald Trump, the women’s march and Theresa May.

She described the women's march for equality over the weekend as: “Pathetic. I can remember when women were not equal.” She went on to say, “we have absolute equality, we have advantages that men haven’t got. I think its gone very unfairly the other way.

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Top five headlines you’re waking up to

  1. The Supreme Court will deliver its landmark ruling today on who has the power to formally trigger Brexit. The decision of 11 judges will determine whether Prime Minister Theresa May can invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty herself, or if she needs the permission of Parliament to do so.

  2. Drivers responsible for the most serious speeding offences are set to face harsher penalties under new sentencing guidelines for magistrates. Fines for motorists caught going well above the speed limit will start from 150% of their weekly income rather than the existing level of 100%.

  3. As many as 5.5 million adults in England with undiagnosed high blood pressure are risking heart attack, stroke or even vascular dementia by not knowing their blood pressure numbers. With only half the adult population knowing their blood pressure and more than a quarter of British adults having high blood pressure, Public Health England (PHE) encourages all adults over the age of 40 to get tested as part of the NHS Health Check, a simple measure that could save their life.

  4. With more fog covering the areas, all London airports at risk. The first "very high" pollution alert has been issued for London by mayor Sadiq Khan, under a new system for warning people about poor air quality.

  5. Today marks 100 days since the offensive in Mosul against ISIS began. According to UNICEF, approximately 160, 000 people - 88,000 of them children - are currently displaced as a result of conflict in Mosul that began on 17 October 2016. The majority of displaced people have taken refuge in camps for displaced people. On the show this morning we have an exclusive interview with the new U.S Commanding General in Iraq - Major General Joseph Martin US Army.

Should sex and relationship education be compulsory in primary schools?

Listen to the cry for help from children

– Maria Miller speaks on children's desire to learn about sex and relationship education

More than eight in 10 Britons think sex and relationship education should be compulsory in schools, according to new research. The finding comes as the Government faces increasing calls for the classes to be mandatory amid growing evidence young people are facing widespread sexual harassment and abuse.

Former minister for women and equalities Maria Miller will call for compulsory sex education in primary and secondary schools and to not allow parents to withdraw.

Maria told us: "By the time children have reached 10 or 11 they would have seen pornography online for the first time, and one in five would have been subject to cyber bullying."

Could burnt food increase the risk of cancer?

Over cooking is harmful

– Dr Hilary

Roasting and frying starchy foods could increase the risk of cancer, a Government body has said. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has issued a public warning over the risks of acrylamide - a chemical compound that forms in some foods when they are cooked at high temperatures (above 120C).

We were joined by Dr Hilary who told us the FSA can't tell exactly how much exposure is needed to get cancer, but he did leave us with advice to reduce the risk:

  • Cut down exposure by not overcooking
  • Store raw potatoes in cool dark places, not the fridge
  • Follow the instructions on packaged food, it is designed to minimise exposure

Top five headlines you’re waking up to

  1. A huge week for the Prime Minister Theresa May as she prepares for her first real Brexit challenge - the Supreme Court's decision on Tuesday on triggering Article 50, becoming the first world leader to meet America's new President Donald Trump and, today, launching her vision of Britain's post-Brexit industrial strategy. The prime minister was repeatedly pressed about whether she would tackle the US president on Friday about sexism after up to 2 million people joined women’s marches around the world on Saturday to protest against the new president. More than 80,000 people gathered in London.

  2. Roasting and frying starchy foods could increase the risk of cancer, a Government body has said. The Food Standards Agency has issued a public warning over the risks of acrylamide - a chemical compound that forms in some foods when they are cooked at high temperatures (above 120C). A new campaign tells people how they can cut their risk, including opting for a gold colour - rather than darker brown - when frying, roasting, baking, grilling or toasting. Acrylamide is found in high levels in a range of foods including breakfast cereals (not porridge), chips, potato products (such as waffles or children's potato shapes), biscuits, crackers, crispbread and crisps.

  3. More than eight in ten Britons think sex and relationship education should be compulsory in schools, according to new research. The finding comes as the Government faces increasing calls for the classes to be mandatory amid growing evidence young people are facing widespread sexual harassment and abuse. Former minister for women and equalities Maria Miller will call for compulsory sex education in primary and secondary schools and to not allow parents to withdraw.

  4. More than 40 drivers were caught every hour during a police crackdown on illegal mobile phone use behind the wheel. Officers handed out 7,966 fixed penalty notices for the offence in a week-long campaign in November. The tally - equivalent to a rate of more than 1,000 every day, and 47 an hour - is the highest yet for a week of enforcement on "distraction driving".

  5. The rise of computers may eventually kill off handwriting but, for now, there are still some aficionados out there who refuse to put their pens down. But what does your handwriting say about your personality? Research by the National Pen Company in the US claims handwriting can give clues about 5,000 personality traits.

William and Kate set to become full-time Royals

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their children are set to move to London this summer after he announced plans end his role as a pilot with the East Anglia Air Ambulance to commit to his royal duties full time.

In a statement released by Kensington Palace the Duke thanked the people of East Anglia for their support during his two years in the role and for "letting me get on with the job when they have seen me in the community".

"Following on from my time in the military, I have had experiences in this job I will carry with me for the rest of my life, and that will add a valuable perspective to my Royal work for decades to come."

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Prostate cancer: the biggest leap in decades

It's been called the biggest leap in decades. The latest prostate cancer breakthrough gives new hope to men suffering from the deadly condition. Suspected prostate cancer sufferers can undergo an initial MRI scan to improve detection of aggressive forms of the disease.

The initial MRI scan can potentially do the following:

  • Double the number of tumours caught
  • Reduce the number of men having biopsies by 27%
  • Reduce the number of men who are diagnosed with a cancer that later proves harmless by 5%
  • Save money for the NHS

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