News

Live news stream

Death toll of sunken ferry disaster rises to 49

Distraught relatives of hundreds of missing people inside a sunken South Korean ferry clashed with police on Sunday as coastguard divers retrieved more bodies from the ship and the number of confirmed dead rose to 49.

A rescue operation has turned into a grim search through the stricken vessel to recover the remaining 253 passengers, most of them schoolchildren on an outing, who are unaccounted for after Wednesday's capsize.

Searchers retrieved 16 bodies overnight and coastguard officials said cranes would not be deployed to lift the ship off the seabed until the bodies had been recovered.

Tougher mortgage checks expected for new applicants

People applying for a mortgage are facing tougher affordability checks which delve into their spending habits on outgoings ranging from childcare, travel and clothing to wine clubs and even a flutter on the horses.

The higher hurdles are being put in place as lenders gear up for new rules which come into force on Saturday under the Mortgage Market Review (MMR), which aim to prevent any return to irresponsible lending.

Tougher mortgage checks expected for people applying. Credit: PA

Experts are warning people that they may want to consider reining back on their spending several months before applying for a mortgage, as providers will want to sift through around three months of bank statements "with a fine tooth comb".

The new industry-wide rules mean mortgage providers have to take a much keener interest in an applicant's regular outgoings, which could include what they spend on food, household bills, loans, credit cards and leisure activities, in order to weigh up whether or not they can afford their home loan.

Advertisement

Royal couple attend Easter Sunday service in Sydney

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have celebrated Easter at a service in Sydney's St Andrew's Cathedral on the fifth day of their tour of Australia.

The royal couple were met by the Archbishop of Sydney, the Most Rev Dr Glenn Davies, when they arrived at the cathedral for the 65 minute long service.

The Duchess of Cambridge, and Prince William arrive at Sydney's St Andrew's Cathedral Credit: Reuters
Crowds await the Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William in Sydney Credit: Reuters

RBS may sue after accused of 'undermining small firms'

The Royal Bank of Scotland is considering legal action against the businessman behind a damning report that accused the taxpayer-backed lender of deliberately putting customers out of business for profit.

The Sunday Telegraph reported that the bank could have grounds to pursue a libel action against Lawrence Tomlinson after an inquiry into his allegations reportedly found no evidence to support claims that the lender’s turnaround unit had systematically engineered the collapse of small businesses.

In its report, Clifford Chance said it found “no evidence” to back up the most serious accusations made by Mr Tomlinson. Credit: PA

Jon Pain, the head of regulatory affairs at RBS, said: “The damage of the report has already been done and whether Mr Tomlinson offers any retraction or apology is a matter for him.

"These were the most serious allegations RBS has faced since the crisis and damaged RBS’s brand and undoubtedly harmed the value of the taxpayer’s interest.”

The law firm Clifford Chance on Thursday published the results of its investigation into the Tomlinson report which said it found "no evidence" to back up the most serious accusation.

London Marathon runner denies cheat claims

A man who ran the second half of the London Marathon in less than half the time it took him to complete the first has denied claims he cheated.

Jason Scotland-Williams, 34, was accused of jumping over a barrier midway through the world famous race in order to achieve the impressive time, which fell just three minutes short of the world record for a half marathon.

Runners during the Virgin Money London Marathon Credit: PA

He told the Sunday Telegraph: "I have done nothing wrong. Nobody thinks maybe I just trained hard. No one thinks 'maybe he paced himself through the first half and when the second half came he just let himself go'.

"All along the route there are stewards and people watching. There's no way you can cheat." Mr Scotland-Williams completed the second half of the route in one hour, one minute and 42 seconds, more than three minutes faster than double Olympic running champion Mo Farah.

Read: Mo Farah reveals 'disappointment' over London Marathon

Families attempt to march to Seoul demanding answers

With 260 passengers still unaccounted for from the South Korean ferry, families scuffled with police as they tried to make their way to the Presidential Blue House in Seoul to complain about the slow rescue operation.

"Take out my child, take out my child please. I've heard they are all dead. Bring me the body so that I can see the face and hug my child. What am I going to do? They are likely dead already," said the mother of missing student Bae Sun-ok.

Pictures: Anger as families clash with police over S. Korea ferry

Advertisement

Anger as families clash with police over S. Korea ferry

Angry relatives of hundreds of missing inside a sunken South Korean ferry clashed with police as coastguard divers retrieved 10 more bodies from the ship and the official number of dead rose to 46 people.

Up to 100 people gathered on the island of Jindo in the southwest of the country, the centre of the rescue effort, and tried to march across a bridge to the mainland to take their protest to the capital of Seoul.

A family member of a passenger missing after the South Korean ferry "Sewol" capsized is blocked by police Credit: Reuters

Police formed two lines to prevent them reaching the bridge and relatives pushed and shoved the lines.

Family members of passengers missing after the South Korean ferry "Sewol" capsized protest in Jindo Credit: Reuters

Christian worker claims unfair dismissal after 'gay jibe'

A Christian nursery nurse is claiming unfair dismissal after losing her job because she said she told a gay colleague that the Bible regards the practice of homosexuality as a sin.

Sarah Mbuyi says she only made the comments after being pressed on her beliefs by a colleague who initiated the conversation at Newpark Childcare in Highbury, north London, in January.

She is being supported in her case by the Christian Legal Centre, whose chief executive, Andrea Williams, said the Government has "seriously let down" the Christian community and criticised Prime Minister David Cameron for attempting to "mould Christianity to his political agenda".

Mr Cameron said earlier this week that Britain should be ''more confident about our status as a Christian country" and "more evangelical about a faith that compels us to get out there and make a difference to people's lives".

Read: PM calls on UK to be 'more confident' about Christianity

Charity watchdog chief warns over 'aiding extremism'

The Charity Commission has warned that Islamist extremism is the "most deadly" problem it faces, urging the government to introduce laws to prevent convicted terrorists from setting up charitable organisations.

The watchdog's chairman William Shawcross told The Sunday Times (£): “The problem of Islamist extremism and charities . . . is not the most widespread problem we face in terms of abuse of charities, but is potentially the most deadly. And it is, alas, growing.”

Charities working abroad need to be 'particularly vigilant' over Islamist extremism Credit: Reuters

He said the commission was taking tough measures against any charity that was “sending cash to extremist groups in Syria” or “dispatching young Britons for training in Syria by al-Qaeda or other extremist groups”.

The regulator is investigating three charities raising funds for Syria and monitoring seven others.

Load more updates