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Report: 'Elitist' Britain dominated by privately-schooled

Britain is still "deeply elitist" with privately-educated pupils and Oxbridge graduates continuing to dominate top roles in society, a major new report warns.

Graduates from Oxford (pictured) and Cambridge Universities are still dominating society, the report warns.
Graduates from Oxford (pictured) and Cambridge Universities are still dominating society, the report warns. Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA Archive

Many of the nation's judges, politicians, armed forces chiefs, journalists, TV executives, public officials and sports stars attended fee-paying schools before going to to study at Oxford and Cambridge, it suggests.

This stark lack of diversity means that many of Britain's key institutions are not representative of the public they serve, and the people running them may not understand the daily issues facing people from different backgrounds, according to the Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission.

The study analysed the backgrounds of more than 4,000 individuals holding top jobs in British society.

Poll: Disabled abuse victims 'unsatisfied with police'

Nearly six out of 10 disabled people who have reported experiencing abuse feel unsatisfied with the way the police handled their cases, according to a new survey.

More than four-fifths of disabled people had encountered some form of abuse, the survey found.
More than four-fifths of disabled people had encountered some form of abuse, the survey found. Credit: Reuters

A report by the Greater London Authority Conservatives found 85% of disabled people had encountered some form of verbal, physical or financial abuse.

Of these, 59% felt unsatisfied with the way police handled the case.

The report, titled Hidden Hate, surveyed 131 disabled people in London.

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TV crew member killed during filming of armed robbery

A crew member has been shot dead while filming the police response to an armed robbery for a US TV series.

CCTV footage shows the armed robber also killed by police.
CCTV footage shows the armed robber also killed by police. Credit: Reuters

Officers accidentally shot sound technician Bryce Dion, 38, who was struck in a gap in his protective clothing, the Omaha Police Department said.

Dion was part of the crew for reality show Cops, and was mistakenly hit after entering a branch of Wendy's restaurant during a shootout which also saw the suspected robber killed.

Spike TV - which carries the series - could not be reached immediately for comment.

Two-thirds of teachers 'not ready for new curriculum'

Some 62% of teachers have admitted they are not ready for the new curriculum being implemented across England's schools this September, a survey from their union found.

Young pupil
Basic fractions, such as half or a quarter, will be taught to five-year-olds. Credit: PA

The Association of Teachers and Lecturers said even more (81%) of teachers felt they had not been given enough time to implement the targets.

Changes include the requirement for pupils to learn their 12 times table by the age of nine, and students between the ages of 11 and 14 to have studied two Shakespeare plays.

Almost half of teachers voiced concerns over plans to introduce computer coding lessons - some 58% felt their school had not been given enough support to implement the syllabus.

Over half of parents 'unaware of curriculum shake-up'

More than half of parents with children in the English education system did not know there would be a huge shake-up in what their child was taught this year, a poll for Good Morning Britain has showed.

Pupil
11-year-olds should be spelling Credit: PA

Some 56% of parents did not know children as young as seven would start learning a foreign or ancient language, under the Coalition's education policy.

One of the biggest changes - the introduction of coding classes to IT - three-quarters (75%) of parents were unaware of.

Most parents expressed a sense of disengagement with what went on in schools; of the 2000 parents who took part in the survey, 62% felt they did not have a say in their child's education.

Read: 'Rigorous' curriculum unveiled

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Britain 'not asked by US to join strikes on Islamic State'

Britain has not been requested to join strikes against the Islamic State, Downing Street has insisted.

The wreckage of a car belonging to Islamic State militants in northern Iraq.
The wreckage of a car belonging to Islamic State militants in northern Iraq. Credit: Reuters

The Times reported that the Pentagon had been exploring whether western allies such as Britain and Australia, and allied Gulf states, would assist in a broader campaign in Syria against the radical group.

The United States has launched scores of bombing attacks on Islamic State (IS) militants in northern Iraq in a bid to assist Kurdish and Iraqi forces in their fightback.

But a No 10 spokeswoman said: "There's been no request for us to deliver air strikes and this is not something under discussion at the moment.

"Our focus remains on supporting the Iraq government and Kurdish forces so that they can counter the threat posed by Isil, for example with the visit of our security envoy to Iraq this week and the provision of supplies to Kurdish forces."

MP blasts 'woolly-minded elite' running child services

The long-term sex abuse in Rotherham was repeatedly over-looked by a "liberal, woolly-minded, middle class elite" unable to understand the lives of inner-city children, according to a Labour MP.

Simon Danczuk
Danczuk's Rochdale constituency was also blighted by a sex-trafficking scandal, instigated by a group of Pakistani men. Credit: PA

Writing in the Daily Mail, Simon Danczuk was highly critical of "media friendly" multiculturalism and suggested the abuse had been exacerbated by police, social services and child protection leaders overly concerned with political correctness.

The problems, I very firmly believe, all stem from the top. I believe that all those three agencies are run by a liberal, woolly-minded, middle-class elite who simply cannot conceive of the truly miserable lives that some inner-city children in this country are forced to endure, and who prefer to concentrate on media-friendly ideas such as multiculturalism, diversity and community values – rather than on something as wicked as the rape of a child. They do not pursue the perpetrators because, blinded by political correctness, they simply do not see the abuse.

– Simon Danczuk

Read: Labour MP to refer Shaun Wright for police probe

Ebola vaccine to be trialled on humans 'within weeks'

Human safety trials on an experimental Ebola vaccine will begin in the coming weeks, US health officials are to announce today.

The GlaxoSmithKline experimental vaccine will be tested within weeks, sources say.
The GlaxoSmithKline experimental vaccine will be tested within weeks, sources say. Credit: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

The GlaxoSmithKline vaccine will be available for the tests sooner than originally estimated, sources told Reuters.

US officials have also approved the first steps toward using three advanced laboratories to manufacture Ebola vaccines and treatments, the news agency reports.

PM heads to Scotland to make case for Union

David Cameron heads to Scotland today in a call to keep the Union together.

The Prime Minister will address CBI Scotland.
The Prime Minister will address CBI Scotland. Credit: Philip Toscano/PA Wire

With just three weeks to go until the independence referendum, the Prime Minister will address he business organisation CBI Scotland's annual dinner in Glasgow.

The Conservative leader will use his trip north to make the business case for Scotland remaining in the UK - describing Britain as one of the world's "oldest and most successful single markets".

It comes the day after 130 business leaders in Scotland signed an open letter which declared that the case for leaving the UK "has not been made".

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