Democracy and trade deals: Why Cameron is in Indonesia

The Prime Minister inspecting Indonesian troops in Jakarta Photo: ITV News

David Cameron has just touched down in Jakarta as he continues his trip of Asia.

With 248 million people, Indonesia is the world's fourth most populated country and the economy here is growing at six per cent a year. There is a growing middle class and yet the UK accounts for less than one per cent of imports to this country.

The Prime Minister is welcomed at the airport in Jakarta. Credit: ITV News

The Prime Minister thinks there are opportunities for Britain to sell its products to Indonesia and the business delegation accompanying him will be looking to make progress in that area.

There is another pre-planned announcement. Yesterday it was Nissan in Japan. Today it is Airbus. The Indonesian carrier Garuda has bought 11 of its planes and the UK is supplying the wings from Wales.

The Indonesian carrier Garuda has bought 11 of its planes and the UK is supplying the wings from Wales.

But the country is also significant for another reason: 86 per cent of Indonesians are Muslim. It makes Indonesia home to the world's largest Muslim population. And it is a democracy.

And that makes this country - already in the G20 and soon to be among the top 10 economies in the world - an important focal point for Mr Cameron as he seeks to encourage other Muslim countries to embrace democracy.

That is a subject the Prime Minister will address in a speech here tomorrow.

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