History beckons for Bradley Wiggins

Bradley Wiggins has assuredly won the Tour De France Photo: Stephane Mahe / Reuters

Paris is filled with British cycling fans.

From Manchester and Wigan, London and Glasgow, fans are taking their places on the Champs-Élysées to witness what many of them thought they'd never see: a British rider arriving in the yellow jersey.

It has taken 99 years, but by four o'clock this afternoon Bradley Wiggins will be become the first British man crowned winner of the Tour de France, the most famous and most prestigious cycle race in the world.

The French, it must be said, can't muster much enthusiasm for his victory. They complain of a lack of 'magic' in Wiggins' win, a lack of charisma in the Team Sky leader.

The dominance of that team has much to do with their discontent: the expensively assembled and scientifically trained stable of riders has exerted such dominance over the péloton that there has been no credible challenge to the British maillot jaune.

In fact, the only man who could realistically take Wiggins on is his team-mate Chris Froome.

When their boss Dave Brailsford talks of 'building on the success' of this year's Tour, where two of his riders will finish in the top three, it's a sign that British cycling fans may not have to wait 99 years to see this again.

See also: Bradley Wiggins: So who is the man in the yellow jersey?