High Court ruling won't derail HS2 plans, minister says

Nine of the ten grounds of challenge related to High Speed 2 (HS2) were rejected at the High Court. Photo: PA

The Government has hailed a "major landmark victory" for its HS2 high-speed rail scheme "and the future of Britain", despite the High Court ruling its consultation process for the project was legally flawed.

Mr Justice Ouseley said consultations on compensation for the owners of properties blighted by the multibillion-pound project were "so unfair as to be unlawful".

But he rejected nine of the ten grounds of challenge to HS2, brought to London's High Court in five cases and involving a multitude of objectors.

Campaign groups have since vowed not to give up their legal fight. ITV News' Mark Davies spent time with some in Buckinghamshire:

The judge's ruling, though, has been celebrated by the Government. Rail Minister Simon Burns said:

The judge has categorically given the green light for the Government to press ahead without delay in building a high-speed railway from London to Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds.

The Government immediately said the consultation exercise would be re-run, meaning people could get more compensation, and pay-outs could rise.

Around 172,000 properties within 0.6 miles (1km) of the first phase are alleged to be affected by the scheme. The legal battle, though, will now shift to the Court of Appeal.