Road testing Google Glass

Buckingham Palace as seen by Google Glass.
Buckingham Palace as seen by Google Glass. Photo: ITV News/ Lewis Vaughan Jones

Two things happened when I wore Google Glass around central London today. First, I got quite a few odd looks from curious onlookers. And second, I looked quite odd too. I pulled some very strange faces as I tried to concentrate on the screen seemingly floating in front of my eye.

Road testing Google Glass.
Road testing Google Glass. Credit: ITV News

At times I shut one eye, others I squinted as I tried to concentrate, but what was remarkable was how quickly it became quite natural.

With a couple of taps on the frame I was taking photos and videos. The voice recognition was accurate and easy to use.

Although it stills feels a bit embarrassing shouting out "OK Glass, get directions to Big Ben" in the middle of the street.

They are light but unless you already wear glasses I'm not sure you would want to wear them all day yet.

Of course there were a couple of snags. Google Glass connects to you mobile so you are at the mercy of 3G coverage.

I found when I was looking at the sky or a light background, I couldn't see the screen anymore.

This is an impressive first generation device. As the technology is refined, more of us will be tempted.

Another pic using Glass. It's voice control so I say "ok glass, take a picture" (it does feel a bit odd)
Another pic using Glass. It's voice control so I say "ok glass, take a picture" (it does feel a bit odd) Credit: ITV News/ Lewis Vaughan Jones

Towards the end of my demo the battery did run out. And that underlines a point, they are not ready yet to be constantly 'On' all the time and recording everything. The screen is just meant to be there when you need it.

You will be able to decide if you need it when they are released in the UK next year.