Malala reunited with friend injured in same Taliban attack

Malala Yousufzai (right) and Shazia Ramzan meet for the first time since the Taliban attack in Pakistan.
Malala Yousufzai (right) and Shazia Ramzan meet for the first time since the Taliban attack in Pakistan. Photo: Ken Bhogal/A World at School/PA Wire

Malala Yousufzai, the 15-year-old girl shot in the head by the Taliban in Pakistan, has been reunited with her lifelong friend who was injured in the same attack.

Malala and Shazia Ramzan, also 15, smiled and hugged at Birmingham Airport as they met for the first time since the vicious attack took place in October last year.

The teenagers were travelling on a school bus on 9 October when Taliban gunmen came in search of Malala, a vocal campaigner for girls' education, and fired at them.

Malala Yousufzai (left) and Shazia Ramzan smile and chat as they are reunited.
Malala Yousufzai (left) and Shazia Ramzan smile and chat as they are reunited. Credit: Ken Bhogal/A World at School/PA Wire

Malala was shot in the head and the bullet "grazed" her brain. Shazia was shot in the neck and shoulder.

Though Malala was airlifted to Birmingham soon after the attack, Shazia stayed in Pakistan and was unable to go to school because of continued threats to her life.

Following the recent surge of violence in Pakistan, Shazia has been granted a student visa by the UK.

Shazia Ramzan speaking to ITV News.
Shazia Ramzan told ITV News she wants to return to Pakistan as a doctor. Credit: ITV News

Shazia told ITV News correspondent Rageh Omaar: "I am very I'm going to continue my education in Britain.

"My dream is to become a doctor and I want to continue my education here. When I go back to Pakistan I want to give all the children hope for the future .. and show them that education is important".

With support from the Office of Gordon and Sarah Brown and other charities, including a scholarship from her new school, Shazia has gained a place to complete her studies.

UN special envoy for global education Gordon Brown and Shazia Ramzan.
UN special envoy for global education Gordon Brown and Shazia Ramzan. Credit: ITV News

Shazia said she wanted to stay in Pakistan and complete her education "but constant threats made this impossible".

UN special envoy for global education Gordon Brown, who first spoke with Shazia when he visited Pakistan in the wake of the attack, told ITV News she is "one of the most courageous and brave people I know".