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  1. ITV Report

Why a winter World Cup might benefit the home nations

A computer image of the 'Al Wakra' stadium, designed by German architect company Albert Speer & Partner to be built in Doha, Qatar. Photo: Balkis Press/ABACA/Press Association Images

The decision to award the World Cup to Qatar was always going to be a controversial choice.

Everyone applauded the reasoning: The World Cup belongs to the world, and therefore it should be awarded to countries who have not previously hosted it.

And it should be used as a way of supporting development in some of the less traditional football countries. Perfect.

Except it's not.

It's going to be too hot in summer in Qatar, with temperatures reaching as much as 50C.

Qatar said it would air condition every stadium. But what about outside the stadiums? Qatar is rich, but even it can't air condition the whole country. So Fifa, world football's governing body, has had to rethink its plans.

A computer image of the 'Al Garafa' stadium, for the FIFA World Cup 2022, to be built in Doha, Qatar. Credit: Balkis Press/ABACA/Press Association Images

And now the body which represents all Europe's clubs and leagues has voted to ask Fifa to move the tournament to the winter, either in January 2022 or November/December 2022.

Fifa are to make a decision at their meeting on 3rd and 4th October. It's likely they'll vote for a winter tournament.

A computer image of the 'Lusail' stadium, designed by British architect Norman Foster, to be built in Doha, Qatar. Credit: Balkis Press/ABACA/Press Association Images

If they do, it'll cause chaos for the European league's fixtures, as the World Cup will fall right in the middle of their seasons. Some estimates say it may affect the schedules up to two years either side of 2022.

It'll also affect Britain's traditional Christmas football programme.

A computer image of the 'Al Khor' stadium, for the FIFA World Cup 2022, to be built in Doha, Qatar. Credit: Balkis Press/ABACA/Press Association Images

For the travelling fans though it's good news as the temperatues will be bearable, and stay at home fans will have to make do with watching the tournament when its cold. So what.

But maybe most importantly it might favour our British international teams too, because of the more favourable temperatues and the players won't be so shattered after a long hectic season.

So every cloud…

Qatar delegates celebrate winning the 2022 FIFA World Cup bid at the FIFA World Cup 2018/2022 Host Cities Credit: Anthony Devlin/PA Archive/Press Association Images