Is the Autumn Statement a statement for business?

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Chancellor George Osborne has delivered his Autumn Statement in the Commons. Photo: Press Association

The Chancellor has chosen measures today that should shove the recovery along and make it a bit easier for some companies to do business.

The Chancellor decided to introduce Tax breaks for firms who want to use empty shops; a cap, not a freeze on business rates; a bit of money off energy bills and scrapping national insurance for young people, should make it much cheaper to take on under 21 year olds.

Other measures like more cash for some social housing and a new tax for foreigners who sell their property could prove popular too.

But unusually for a big set piece event like this, so far no 'Big Bang' surprise announcement was delivered at the end with a flourish. And the statement certainly had a flavour of steady as she goes rather than massive change. Business tends to like that kind of stability in fact.

But for those under 23, the confirmation that the pension age will rise more quickly than expected may take some time to get used to. I've just been talking to Jordan Withey who is 19. He's already been working for years and will have to wait another 51 before he would be able to claim his state pension. Unsurprisingly he's less than impressed.

Read: Political Editor Tom Bradby's analysis: George Osborne's message is 'growth is up, up, up'