Mum uses Facebook to scatter son's ashes at travel destinations around the world

CJ Twomey was only 20 when he died. Photo: Facebook / Scattering CJ

A mother from Maine, USA, has enlisted the help of Facebook and Twitter users to scatter her son's ashes at travel destinations he never had the chance to visit.

Former Air Force man CJ Twomey killed himself in 2010 at the age of 20. His mother Hallie regrets that their last interaction before he died was an argument.

So three years later she started an online campaign to "give him a journey" he never got to complete in life.

A Facebook post from October 2013 read:

Our son did not get to see the world as he might have if he had lived.

Our son did not experience travel as he might have if he had lived.

Our son did not experience adventures as he might have if he had lived.

We'd love for our son to see the mountains that he never got to climb, see the vast oceans that he would have loved, and see tropical beaches and lands far and away.

Volunteers have to follow two rules when they take part in the #ScatteringCJ: They must tell him that his parents love him and that his mother is sorry.

So far his ashes have been scattered across America and in Jamaica, Hawaii, Haiti and India.

The kindness of those helpers has been "overwhelming", Hallie said.

One volunteer, Beth, posted this video of her contribution. "This video is my part in helping Hallie to cope with the loss of her son to suicide," she wrote.

Her Scattering CJ Facebook page has been sharing pictures of other locations the ashes have been taken to:

North Topsail Beach in North Carolina. Credit: Facebook / Scattering CJ

"Unbelievably thankful that even today [Thanksgiving], on a day meant to spend with your own family, time was found to scatter CJ's ashes," Hallie wrote of this picture:

Lake Pattagansett in East Lyme, Connecticut. Credit: Facebook / Scattering CJ

CJ's mother hopes to publish a book with the photographs and notes people have sent her and plans to give the proceeds to the New England Organ Bank, she said.