Isis parades captured military vehicles through Mosul

It's a nightmare scenario: American military hardware in the hands of Islamic fanatics in Iraq.

ITV News has seen footage of an Isis convoy travelling through Mosul late yesterday, the militants showing off the weapons and vehicles they seized when the Iraqi army fled.

ITV News Senior International Correspondent John Irvine reports:

Among the gunmen mounted in the vehicles were two small boys carrying assault rifles. The one child is holding has a telescopic sight: Human Rights Watch say that in Syria Isis has already recruited children as 'snipers' - this could be an indication that the Iraq conflict may see the same.

One of the children on the Isis convoy, armed with an assault rifle and telescopic sight. Credit: ITV News

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Less than an hour's drive from Mosul, US Secretary of State John Kerry met with Kurdish Regional President Massoud Barza, the leader of the Kurds in Iraq where he praised his forces with stopping the advance of Islamic radicals.

Kurdistan Regional Government President Massoud Barzani greets U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at the presidential palace in Arbil. Credit: Reuters

The Kurdish army - the Peshmerga - are re-enforcing positions along the 600-mile border that separates the Kurds from the swathe of Iraq now in the hands of Sunni militants.

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Kurdish Peshmerga soldiers, armed with old weapons, man their outposts. Credit: ITV News

In what ITV News' Senior Foreign Correspondent John Irvine has called "the complex, confusing, sorry mess" that is Iraq today, the Peshmerga are the only forces that share secular values with the West, and the troops are having to defend these values with only their resolve and the poor quality military hardware that Baghdad saw fit to send them. Another example of division in a country that needs unity to survive.

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