1. ITV Report

Medals unveiled for Prince Harry's Invictus Games

The medals and medallions, which will be given to each of the 400 participants of the Paralympic-style Invictus Games, have been unveiled. Photo: Press Association

Specially designed medals for Prince Harry's Invictus Games have been unveiled today at the world's oldest jewellers in London.

The collection of medals, which will be given to the 400 participants of the Paralympic-style competition next month, were revealed at Garrard.

Chief executive Eric Deardorff, the games' chairman Sir Keith Mills, and injured soldier Craig Gadd, revealed the gold, silver and bronze medals and medallions.

Chief executive Eric Deardorff, the games' chairman Sir Keith Mills, and injured soldier Craig Gadd, who is hoping to compete, revealed the medals . Credit: PA

The embossed pattern of stitching on the medals, which symbolises the stitching together of injured soldiers, are based on a concept by Captain Harry Parker, who lost both his legs in an IED blast in Afghanistan.

A quote from William Ernest Henley's Invictus poem, and the Games' I AM logo, are also featured on the medals.

The embossed pattern of stitching of the medals symbolises the stitching together of injured soldiers. Credit: PA

Prince Harry, who is the driving force of the Games, last week pledged to make it a regular event as he called on the public to snap up tickets for the sporting spectacular.

Sir Keith said Prince Harry "loved" the medals, although he had made a few "tweaks" to the original design.

Sir Keith said that Prince Harry Credit: PA

They are befitting of a truly inspirational occasion that will celebrate the Invictus spirit of these amazing men and women.

We don't just want to inspire those who are competing, we want to inspire all those who have been injured, not only in this country but across the world.

These games will have a truly massive impact on that community.

– Sir Keith

Craig Gadd, who is hoping to be selected for the wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball teams, spoke to ITV News Presenter Alistair Stewart:

The 41-year-old, from Hull, who lost his left leg when he stepped on an IED in Afghanistan in October 2010, said: "Sport is a massive part in your recovery and especially the Invictus Games is enabling guys to be able to represent the country once again and feel part of a team."

For many of the guys it's a big thing.

Once you've served your country and you've been discharged, to be back into the fold again and to be part of the team, for some of the guys it's a massive turning point in their lives to be part of something and be part of a team again

– Craig Gadd

Inspired by the US Warrior Games, the Invictus Games will feature sports including archery, wheelchair basketball, powerlifting, indoor rowing, wheelchair rugby, swimming and sitting volleyball.

The Games are due to take place this September in London and will see injured servicemen and women from around the globe competing in a Paralympic-style competition.