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  1. ITV Report

3D-printed bionic Iron Man hand helps four-year-old open Christmas presents for the first time

Brooklyn Brentnall-Croydon discovered the joy of opening his own Christmas presents this year. Credit: SWNS

A four-year-old boy has ripped opened his own Christmas presents for the first time after getting a bionic helping hand just like his Iron Man hero.

Brooklyn Brentnall-Croydon's grandmother had issued a Facebook appeal in October for tech-minded people to create an artificial hand.

The youngster from Doncaster, south Yorkshire was born without a developed right hand.

The design of Brooklyn's bionic hand took inspiration from his action hero Iron Man, played by Robert Downey Jr. Credit: Reuters

Shotton Hall Academy in Durham answered the family's social media plea and delivered the 3D-printed hand little over a week before Christmas.

Brooklyn's mum Marie Brentnall said he was thrilled to have a hand like his Iron Man idol Tony Stark.

This is just a dream come true for us - it has completed our Christmas.

Now he's got two hands, he thinks he's a superhero now - he loves all The Avengers stuff - but Brooklyn has always been a little superhero in our eyes.

– Marie Brentnall

The hand opens and closes when Brooklyn flexes his wrist, meaning he could shred through Santa's presents just like his school friends.

The youngster had one present at the top of his wish list: a bike - so he can ride for the first time and grip with both hands.

Each part of the hand, including the fixings and screws, were printed separately over a 20 hour period. Credit: SWNS

Brooklyn will also be able to play with toys, grip a knife and fork and eventually tie his shoelaces.

Shotton Hall Academy's head of Design Technology, Scott Bradley, said he found Brooklyn's family's appeal impossible to ignore.

After seeing the heartwarming post and having a four-year-old myself we just had to make it come true. We had the technology, the 3D-printer so it just went from there.

– Scott Bradley, Shotton Hall Academy's head of Design Technology

Each part of the hand, including the fixings and screws, was printed separately over a 20 hour period at the technology college.

Mr Bradley said he would adapt the hand or remake the device when Brooklyn grows out of his current version.