Advertisement

  1. ITV Report

What do Cambridge voters want from the General Election?

What do Cambridge voters want from the General Election? Credit: ITV News

Known locally as the Cambridge Cluster, Silcon Fen on the southern tip of the Fens is widely regarded as the European hub for tech innovation.

It's home to more than 2000 companies - ranging from hundreds of successful start ups to giants like Amazon and Google - and generates more than £14 billion in revenue per year.

This historically Labour/Liberal Democrat marginal seat is where where many believe the future of Cambridge lies.

Many employees at Featurespace, an anti-fraud software company in the heart of Silicon Fen, are torn when it comes to how they will vote between the two progressive parties.

Many tech companies rely heavily on skilled workers from Europe. Credit: ITV News

Dr Karthick Tadinada, the Director of Data Science at Featurespace, says some 30 per cent of the company's employees are from the EU.

As the business has expanded over the last 12 years, the UK's relationship with the EU and the flow of skilled workers from Europe has been crucial.

Dr Karthick Tadinada, the Director of Data Science at Featurespace, says

"You're looking for very talented people and those skills are very hard to find.

"So when you've got a large pool of talent, which was the European Union enabled, without there could be trouble getting any real talent pool back into England."

Cambridge has high levels of education and a large high-tech sector. Credit: ITV News

Dr Tadinada believes that Cambridge a vote for the Tories is a "wasted vote" and currently, he is undecided between the Lib Dems and Lab.

"What I quite like about the Lib Dem position is they are offering more clarity around what their vision of British relationship with the EU is," he said.

"What I quite like about Labour is some of the more social justice [aspects]."

He thinks Labour can be trusted to look after the NHS and invest the money it needs.

His own personal experience from when his son was born critically ill made him realise just how important having a strong health service is, he said.

"It's not until you use the NHS like that, when it's the life of your child at stake, that you realise how important it is to invest and to continue to make sure that it is well-funded," he said.

"During that week, I was never happier that I've always paid all of my taxes.

"In my hour of need to have that quality of care and to be able to walk away without a bill is just incredible."

But Dr Tadinada says the Lib Dem's anti-Brexit policies could swing his vote but insists both parties need to be much clearer and provide more detail on exactly what their vision of Brexit looks like.

Cambridge voted 74% to remain in the EU, and although staff at Featurespace acknowledge Brexit is going to happen, the key to their votes will rely on exactly how it happens.