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Prince v President? Charles criticises those who question climate change

Prince Charles has highlighted what he referred to as 'terrifying environmental issues'. Credit: PA

Two days after Donald Trump left the US isolated on the issue of climate change at the G20 summit of world leaders, the Prince of Wales has said it is “unbelievable” that some people still question the need to tackle what he called “terrifying environmental issues”.

Prince Charleswas speaking in Wales at a conference on sustainability where he warned that our impact on the environment risks “derailing humanity’s place on Earth for good.”

Mr Trump has previously said global warming was a “concept” which was “created by and for the Chinese in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive”.

He recently withdrew the USA from the Paris Agreement on climate change.

Trump withdrew from the agreement stating the US wanted a new deal with 'fairer terms'. Credit: AP

The prince, however, has been speaking of his concern for the environment since the late 1960s.

He turned his gardens at Highgrove into an organic farm and he converted his vintage Aston Martin so it runs on excess wine which would otherwise be disposed of.

So he was always likely to be an opponent of President Trump’s views on climate change.

Members of the Royal family never criticise elected politicians directly but it’s hard to interpret Prince Charles’ words today as anything other than a swipe at the US President.

The prince, who is in Wales for a series of engagements this week, said humans were “doing our utmost to test to destruction” the ecosystems upon which we all depend.

After warning that humans risked derailing our place on Earth, Prince Charles said: "This is why I have been trying to say for so long that we have to look urgently at what will restore nature's balance before it is finally too late - and that moment, I hate to say, is upon us."

On a recent trip to the Arctic Circle in Canada, the Prince of Wales spoke of the depleting sea ice which risked making a reality, the fabled Northwest Passage for shipping.