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Research shows first-time buyers pay less than renters

First-time buyers are now paying around £1,300 less than people who rent, new research has found.

First time buyers pay £1,300 less than renters according to Halifax.
First time buyers pay £1,300 less than renters according to Halifax. Credit: PA

Running a three-bedroom house for someone taking their first step on the property ladder now costs £677, which is £110 lower than the typical monthly rent paid on a similar property, according to the Halifax bank.

They said that while the typical monthly cost of buying a home has increased by £25 compared with a year ago, typical rental costs have have risen by £42 a month to now stand at £787 a month on average.

Five years ago, the average cost of owning your first property was around £37 a month more expensive than renting, they added.

John Lennon's killer denied parole for eighth time

John Lennon's killer has been denied parole for the eighth time.

Reuters
A mugshot of Mark David Chapman, who shot and killed John Lennon. Credit: Reuters

Mark David Chapman, 59, was sentenced to 20 years to life in prison after pleading guilty to second-degree murder.

A three-member parole board denied Chapman's release at a hearing on Wednesday.

Chapman shot Lennon four times outside the former Beatle's Manhattan apartment building in December 1980.

He can apply again for parole in two years time.

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Citizens Advice: Small price rises can have a 'big impact'

Small increases in phone and broadband bills "could have a big impacts on family finances," according to the chief executive of Citizens Advice.

Utility companies need to be up front with their prices, according to the chief executive of Citizens Advice.
Utility companies need to be up front with their prices, according to the chief executive of Citizens Advice. Credit: PA

Speaking after BT announced that prices for phone and broadband packages will rise by up to 6.5%, Gillian Guy said: "Inflation-busting price rises are bad news for cash-strapped households."

She added: "With the extremely tough pressures on household budgets at present and wages that will continue to stay way below inflation, even a small increase in phone and broadband bills could have a big impact on family finances."

Utility providers need to be up front with their customers about when prices are going up and where there are savings to be made, she said, adding that Citizens Advice has dealt with more than 62,000 telephone and broadband debt problems in the last 12 months.

BT is 'sensitive to the tough economic times'

BT's chief executive has insisted the company is "sensitive to the tough economic times," despite announcing a rise in prices from December.

.BT chief executive John Petter BT was sensitive to tough economic times
BT chief executive John Petter BT was sensitive to tough economic times Credit: PA

John Petter said: "Although some prices have gone up, we want to help our customers to find the best value BT option with Right Plan."

Petter added: "BT is sensitive to the tough economic times and we've taken care to make sure that low-income customers avoid price increases. We've added extra money-saving options for low-income customers and for customers who only want a phone line for calls."

BT prices set to rise by up to 6.5% from December

BT is set to increase prices by up to 6.5%, with landline calls, broadband internet and standard line rental for direct debit customers all set to rise.

BT announced prices will rise by up to 6.5% from December.
BT announced prices will rise by up to 6.5% from December. Credit: Nick Ansell/PA Wire

The telecoms giant said the pence per minute (ppm) rate for calls to UK landlines and 0870 numbers will go up 6.44% from 9p a minute to 9.58p. The set-up fee for landline calls will increase from 15p to 15.97p.

Broadband prices are going up by as much as 6.49%, although BT said its current "high profile" press and TV broadband offers will stay the same price.

They said the majority of its customers were on inclusive call packages and did not pay the set-up fee or ppm charges, adding that calls bills had "decreased 14% in the last five years".

Hospital parking reformed to 'end unfair charges'

Relatives of chronically ill patients will be given free or cheap hospital parking under new guidelines announced by the Government.

Patients with disabilities, those who have regular appointments and staff working shifts will also benefit from the changes, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said.

PA Wire
Jeremy Hunt has announced plans to reform hospital parking rules. Credit: PA Wire

Hospitals will more responsible for the actions of privately funded firms used to run parking operations, under the reforms which will also advise trusts to introduce pay on exit systems to help patients.

Trusts will also be expected to waive fines if a driver's parking limit overruns because treatment took longer than planned.

Mr Hunt said the new rules for English hospitals would put an end to the stress of "unfair" charges.

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US threatens further sanctions over Russian aid convoy

The White House joined Kiev tonight in accusing Russia of a "flagrant violation of international law" after a convoy of lorries carrying humanitarian aid crossed the border with Ukraine without permission.

It said Russia should remove them immediately, or face further economic sanctions.

ITV News' Europe Editor James Mates reports from Washington:

Majority of young British Muslims 'feel disenfranchised'

A British Muslim leader has told ITV News he cannot reach young Muslims at risk of radicalisation because the vast majority feel disenfranchised.

Ajmal Masroor, who works against extremism, said his biggest problem in tackling the issue was the failure of Government policy in the past.

ITV News Correspondent Lewis Vaughan Jones reports:

Muslims criticise Cameron for policy on radicalisation

The Prime Minister faces criticism over his policy towards the radicalisation of young British Muslims from Muslims themselves

Hundreds have travelled to Syria and Iraq to join Islamic State and other extremist groups, apparently including the man who murdered journalist James Foley on-screen.

A top adviser to the Muslim Council of Britain has told ITV News that firmer action is required from David Cameron.

ITV News Political Correspondent Carl Dinnen reports:

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