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Woman with MS describes 'horrendous' Dover ordeal

A woman with multiple sclerosis travelling to Germany for potentially life-changing treatment has said she endured a 20-hour ordeal due to severe delays at Dover.

Tanya Cudworth, 50, was travelling to a clinic in Frankfurt to undergo stem cell treatment for her condition after raising £5,000 for the trip.

She told the Press Association, that she set off from Tunbridge Wells at 8.30am on Saturday with her partner but they did not board a ferry until 4.20 am on Sunday.

Ms Cudworth described the experience as "absolutely horrendous".

I'm taking the trip to get this treatment that I hope will keep me from having to go in a wheelchair. It's not available on the NHS and we've done some fundraising. It's a good job I didn't have to be at the hospital sooner - 19 hours in the car has obviously aggravated my symptoms.

– Tanya Cudworth,

Ms Cudworth also claimed the couple "didn't get any water until 3am".

"I saw women with babies, young families and people with pets with no water. It's shocking that more wasn't done to get it to people, the authorities weren't anywhere to be seen."

"My partner has been a lorry driver since he got his licence and he has never seen anything like it here or abroad," she added.

Hammond: Brexit uncertainty may ease later this year

Chancellor Philip Hammond has said that uncertainty about how the UK country will leave the European Union could be eased later this year, as negotiating positions of both sides become clearer.

Philip Hammond has been meeting finance counterparts in China

"What will start to reduce uncertainty is when we are able to set out more clearly the kind of arrangement we envisage going forward with the European Union," Hammond said a at the end of a G20 meeting of top finance officials.

"If our European Union partners respond to such a vision positively - obviously it will be subject to negotiation - so that there is a sense perhaps later this year that we are all on the same page in terms of where we expect to be going."

He added: "I think that will send a reassuring signal to the business community and to markets."

The Brexit vote result has featured heavily in the agenda of G20 meetings in Chengdu and officials from many countries have said they want more clarity on how the process will unfold.

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Motorists on A20 face five hour wait delay to reach Dover

Motorists travelling to the Port of Dover on the A20 have been advised that they face a five hour wait from the RoundHill tunnel to reach the port.

The estimated waiting time for those arriving on the A2 from Whitfield is 60 minutes

Upon arrival at the port, estimated waiting time to reach French Border checks is approximately 90 mins.

UK to help with French security checks at Dover

Queuing traffic on the A20 near Dover in Kent Credit: PA

UK Border Force staff have been drafted in to assist with French border checks at the Port of Dover, after motorists were caught up in delays of up to 15 hours on Saturday.

It comes after the government said motorists had suffered "extraordinary disruption", due to increased security checks in the wake of recent terror attacks in France.

Police have warned the delays could last until Monday.

Situation 'desperate' in Dover for stranded drivers

Drivers who have been stranded in Dover for almost a day say the situation is getting "desperate".

Drivers have been stranded for hours Credit: Anita Klipanovic

One man, who said he had been stuck for 19 hours, posted a picture of his young granddaughter, who he said had become "weak and dehydrated" as the nearest place to buy water was a three-mile walk away.

Meanwhile, University of Bolton graduate Anita Klipanovic - who had been on her way to a week's holiday in Croatia - said she had been stuck in the queue for 13 hours.

Hundreds of motorists were forced to spend the night in their cars as increased security checks by French border control in the wake of recent terror threats caused lengthy delays.

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