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'At least 18 killed' in Hiroshima landslides

At least eighteen people were killed in Japan when landslides touched off by torrential rain slammed into the outskirts of the city of Hiroshima, including several children, police and media said.

Thirteen people were also missing, media said, after a month's worth of rain fell overnight, loosening slopes already saturated by heavy rain over the past few weeks.

Local residents wait for rescue operation atop of collapsed houses as rescue workers stand by next to them
Local residents wait for rescue operation atop of collapsed houses as rescue workers stand by next to them Credit: Reuters
An aerial view shows a landslide that swept through a residential area at Asaminami ward in Hiroshima
An aerial view shows a landslide that swept through a residential area at Asaminami ward in Hiroshima Credit: Reuters
A local resident is lifted by a rescue helicopter
A local resident is lifted by a rescue helicopter Credit: Reuters

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Hamas claims militant leader's wife and child killed

Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip fired rockets at Israel for a second day after fighting resumed with the collapse of truce talks and an Israeli air strike that killed three people in Gaza.

Charging Israel had "opened a gateway to hell," Hamas's armed wing vowed to target Israel's Ben-Gurion International Airport with rocket fire, possibly to retaliate for what Hamas was quoted by Israeli media Haaretz as saying was an Israeli attempt to assassinate its top militant leader, Mohammed Deif, in a Gaza City strike.

It was not clear whether Deif, who has survived previous Israeli attacks, had survived the strike that killed a woman and a two-year-old girl who media reports said may have been his wife and daughter.

Ferguson officers 'did not reciprocate heavy fire'

Captain Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol answers media questions
Captain Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol answers media questions Credit: Reuters

State Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson, placed in command of security in Ferguson last week after local police tactics that were criticised as overly harsh, said officers had come under "heavy gunfire" on Monday night but did not return it.

The predominantly African-American community of 21,000 people has been gripped by street protests punctuated by looting and clashes with police every night since the unarmed, 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a white police officer.

"Our innocent people need for a moment to go into their homes and not allow this criminal element to hide behind them," Johnson told reporters.

Mothers 'shouldn't feel guilty about not breastfeeding'

There needs to be better support for new mothers, whether they breastfeed or not, the head of the Royal College of Midwives said.

Cathy Warwick added that "women should not feel guilty about not breastfeeding."

A new study has revealed women who want to breastfeed but are unable to are at most risk of developing postnatal depression.

It is vital [women] receive high-quality support immediately after the baby is born and throughout the postnatal period.

If better support was available, less women would face the disappointment of not being able to breastfeed. However, not all women do successfully breastfeed their baby and it is critical, as this study points out, that midwives are also able to support women positively when this is the case.

Women should not feel guilty about not breastfeeding and should be helped to feed their baby in a way which encourages close contact and mother/baby interaction.

– Cathy Warwick

Graduate holds up sign at station and lands interview

A Coventry graduate landed himself an interview on the same day after he was seen standing outside Waterloo station holding a placard with his details for potential employers.

Alfred Ajani was offered job interviews as far afield as Barcelona. Following the response, the graduate said: "Few opportunities look to be coming my way. Would advise recent graduates to do what I did".

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I got out there today got a few email addresses and some business cards someone even bought me a coffee. http://t.co/i0XfRuG7nl

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Supermarket shoppers pick 'price over quality'

Supermarket
Budget chains like Aldi and Lidl are challenging the big supermarkets Credit: PA

Nearly half of shoppers choose their supermarket based on price, a new poll has found.

And of the 38% of consumers who have changed supermarket in the last year, two thirds said they did so because of price.

The survey by Good Morning Britain and OnePoll also revealed that cost is what influences buying habits the most, above quality, offers or reward points.

German low-cost supermarket Lidl has been included in The Grocer magazine's weekly price survey for the first time, which found it sold a basket of common groceries for 29% cheaper than Tesco.

It also came in second for customer service.

Aldi's sales have jumped 32% in the last year, taking its market share to a record 4.8%.

Read: Tesco sales and profits 'somewhat below expectations'

New pictures from ISS shows stunning Northern Lights

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman has captured pictures of the Northern Lights from space. Wiseman is currently halfway through a 166-day mission aboard the International Space Station in low Earth orbit.

Wiseman tweeted a picture of the spectacle in all its glory:

Failing to collect data 'devastating impact' on neglect

The Department for Education has admitted that councils need to gather information to spot early signs of neglect, after a report suggested around 60% of local authorities were missing key structures to address the situation.

We agree that councils need to gather information to spot the early signs of neglect, which can have devastating consequences for the most vulnerable.

[We] are overhauling the training and evaluation of social workers to give trainees the expertise they need to tackle neglect. We have also given the NSPCC over £11 million to run a comprehensive 24/7 advice and reporting service for those who have concerns about a child, and are developing training materials with the sector to help improve practice in this area.

– Spokeswoman, Department for Education

Breastfeeding 'helps prevent postnatal depression'

There may be a link between breastfeeding and a mother's chances of developing postnatal depression, new research has found.

The study, published in the journal Maternal and Child Health, found women who planned to breastfeed, and went on to, were 50% less likely to become depressed than mothers who did not breastfeed.

A study has found women who breastfeed are less likely to develop postpartum depression
A study has found women who breastfeed are less likely to develop postpartum depression Credit: PA

Women who planned to breastfeed but were unable to were at the highest risk of developing the condition, more than twice as likely to become depressed as mothers who had not planned to breastfeed and didn't.

The survey of the mothers of almost 14,000 babies in the Bristol area during the 1990s found the link was strongest when babies were two months old, but much smaller by the time they were eight months or older.

Around 13% of new mothers experience postpartum depression within 14 weeks of giving birth, posing serious mental health problems for the mother and having a significant effect on the newborn's development, the researchers said.

Read: Survey: New mothers feel ‘bullied’ into breastfeeding

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