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Club receives 'death threats' after taking down a Banksy

The manager of the youth club who has laid claim to the latest Banksy artwork said yesterday he has received death threats after he "took an opportunity" to save his struggling youth service by removing the artwork.

Dennis Stinchcombe MBE, leader of struggling Broad Plain and Riverside Youth Project, said he had taken around 40 phone calls from angry street art fanatics.

The new Bristol Banksy artwork's new home in Broad Plain Boys Club. Credit: SWNS Group

He said: "People have been calling up and telling us we have no right to take it down, that it is public and we are stealing.

"People have even said they are going to come down here and sort us out, all sorts of nasty things to us. We have even had death threats."

More: Banksy artwork found in Bristol and then removed hours later

He said if he hadn't taken the artwork "someone else would have and I wasn't going to let that happen".

Bristol City Council is yet to comment, and local police have not opened an investigation.

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Coulson: Blunkett voicemails 'only ones I heard'

Andy Coulson outside the Old Bailey.
Andy Coulson outside the Old Bailey. Credit: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire

Andy Coulson has told court the phone hacking trial that David Blunkett's voicemails were the only ones he personally heard.

Mr Coulson said he was "shocked" when reporter Neville Thurlbeck played him the recordings, which indicated the then Home Secretary was having an affair with Kimberly Fortier, who was publisher of the Spectator at the time.

Mr Coulson denies one count of conspiring to hack phones and two counts of conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office.

Read: Coulson admits hearing hacked Blunkett voicemail

Four confirmed dead in capsized South Korea ferry

Four people have been confirmed dead and almost 300 people were missing after a ferry capsized off the coast of South Korea.

The ferry was carrying 459 people, of whom 164 have been rescued, coastguard officials said, though they earlier admitted to some confusion over the numbers missing.

South Korean coast guard officers try to rescue passengers from a ferry.

According to a coast guard official in Jindo, the waters where the ferry capsized have some of the strongest tides of any off South Korea's coast, meaning divers were prevented from entering the mostly submerged ship for several hours.

A member of the crew of a local government ship involved in the rescue, who said he had spoken to members of the sunken ferry's crew, said the area was free of reefs or rocks and the cause was likely to be some sort of malfunction on the vessel.

Read: '290 missing' after South Korea ferry sinks

Armoured vehicles flying Russian flag enter Slaviansk

Pro-Russian forces have been seen entering the eastern Ukrainian town of Slaviansk on armoured personnel carriers which reportedly were previously under the control of the Ukrainian military.

One of the vehicles was seen flying a Russian flag, while several of the people sitting on board were wearing black and orange ribbons of St George, a symbol commonly associated with pro-Russian protests in Ukraine.

Read: Nato to bolster eastern European forces 'immediately'

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Nato to bolster eastern European forces 'immediately'

Nato has decided to reinforce its forces in eastern Europe "immediately" as a result of the crisis in Ukraine, Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen has said.

"You will see deployments at sea, in the air, on land to take place immediately, that means within days," Mr Rasmussen told a news conference.

Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaking to reporters at Nato headquarters in Brussels today Credit: Associated Press

The move means Nato fighter planes will fly more sorties over the Baltic region, with ships being sent to the Baltic sea and the eastern Mediterranean.

Read: Hague: Russia faces 'long-term consequences' over Ukraine

Coulson 'didn't know Blunkett hack was illegal'

Andy Coulson has said he regrets not telling David Blunkett that his phone had been hacked, claiming he did not know at the time that the practice was illegal.

Mr Coulson told the Old Bailey that he confronted the former Home Secretary after intercepted voicemails indicated he was having an affair. However, he had refused to mention how he had made the discovery, the jury heard.

"At that stage, I didn’t know it was illegal and I felt it was possibly justified," he said.

Mr Coulson was then asked if the News International lawyer told him that phone hacking was against the law.

"At the time of David Blunkett, there was no mention of illegality," he replied.

Mr Coulson denies one count of conspiring to hack phones and two counts of conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office.

Vehicles flying Russian flag enter town of Slaviansk

Armed men have entered the Ukrainian town of Slaviansk on armoured personnel vehicles, some of which are flying the Russian flag.

Armed men pictured in Slaviansk sitting on top of armoured personnel vehicles, one of which is flying the Russian flag Credit: REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

Some of the men were wearing black and orange ribbons of St George, a symbol commonly associated with pro-Russian protests in Ukraine.

Armed men in balaclavas stand in the Ukrainian town of Slaviansk Credit: REUTERS/Gleb Garanich

The vehicles had repotedly previously been under the control of the Ukrainian military.

Read: Hague: Russia faces 'long-term consequences' over Ukraine

Coulson: Blunkett hack 'made me angry'

Former David Blunkett's voicemails were subject to hacking.
Court has heard that David Blunkett (pictured) had his voicemails hacked. Credit: Chris Radburn/PA Wire

Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson has told court that he used "colourful language" upon discovering that an employee had hacked the voicemail of then Home Secretary David Blunkett.

The 46-year-old told the Old Bailey: "I was shocked, because [chief reporter Neville Thurlbeck] told me he had heard some voicemail messages.

"I can’t remember exactly what was said, but I know I was quite angry about it," he added.

However, he said Mr Thurlbeck later convinced him that the voicemails indicated Mr Blunkett was "sharing information, sensitive information, that he shouldn’t have been sharing".

Mr Coulson faces charges related to alleged phone hacking between 2000 and 2006 as well as two counts of conspiring to commit misconduct in a public office.

Read: Coulson admits hearing hacked Blunkett voicemail

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