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Thai junta leader elected PM after military rule

Thai junta leader General Prayuth Chan-ocha was elected prime minister in parliament in a move that has been widely expected since he seized power in May.

Prayuth has won at least half the votes, the required number needed to secure his nomination, a live television broadcast of the parliamentary session showed. The 60-year-old was the only person nominated.

Thai Army chief General Prayuth Chan-ocha
Thai Army chief General Prayuth Chan-ocha Credit: Reuters

His appointment will need to be formally approved by Thailand's king. The military says it took power on May 22 to avoid further bloodshed and restore stability after months of unrest pitting supporters of ousted Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra against her Bangkok-based royalist opponents.

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Governor meets with school leaders over Ferguson unrest

The Governor of Missouri has met with local school leaders in Ferguson, after schools were forced to close amid violent unrest over the police shooting of teenager Michael Brown.

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Talking w/ #Ferguson area school superintendents about taking care of kids in a difficult time http://t.co/CIe3oi8nJH

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Thankful 4 calmer night in #Ferguson. Good to 2c peaceful protesters & community ldrs standing w law enforcement against violent instigators

UNHCR: 'Very urgent need' of Iraqi refugees at camp

The Badhet Kandela camp was being expanded at the weekend to meet the needs of a growing influx of displaced Iraqis. The former transit camp or Syrian refugees, situated near Iraqi Kurdistan's border with Syria, is now home to more than 11,000 Iraqis, according to the UN.

UNHCR field officer Bahzad Amin spoke of the "very urgent need" of the families who had recently arrived, saying: "We are trying to manage better for the basic facilities, water delivery, latrines installation and so on."

Marina Silva confirmed as Brazil presidential candidate

Environmentalist Marina Silva will be the new presidential candidate for Brazil's Socialist Party a week after its previous nominee was killed in a plane crash.

Ms Silva, who had been Eduardo Campos' vice presidential running mate, met members of the party in Brasilia who officially approved her as the new candidate.

Brazilian politician Marina Silva speaks during a news conference in Brasilia
Brazilian politician Marina Silva speaks during a news conference in Brasilia Credit: Reuters

The decision was widely expected. Party members and Ms Silva's associates had said over the weekend that the main leaders had already chosen her to run in Mr Campos' place.

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Liberia denies 'shoot to kill' after unrest over Ebola

Riot police and soldiers acting on their president's orders used scrap wood and barbed wire to seal off 50,000 people inside a Liberian shanty town on Wednesday, trying to contain the Ebola outbreak that has killed 1,350 people and counting across West Africa.

Hundreds of residents clashed with the gunmen, furious at being blamed and isolated by a government that has failed to quickly collect dead bodies from the streets.

Speaking in the Liberian capital Monrovia, Brownie Samukai, Liberia's Minister of National Defence, said the "Armed Forces of Liberia has not been issued any orders of shoot to kill".

Lord Falconer: Suicide tourism 'only allowed for the rich'

Lord Falconer pictured ahead of a debate in to assisted dying.
Lord Falconer pictured ahead of a debate in to assisted dying this year. Credit: PA

Introducing the Assisted Dying Bill in the UK would not lead to more death but to less suffering, Lord Falconer said during a debate in the House of Lords, as figures released showed that the number of of people travelling to Switzerland to take their own lives had doubled in four years.

The current situation leaves the rich able to go to Switzerland, the majority reliant on amateur assistance, the compassionate treated like criminals.

It is time for a change in the law but only a very limited and safeguarded change.

– Lord Falconer

Employers 'failing to check proof of degree'

A third of employers assume job applicants are telling the truth about their degree and do not ask to see proof of their qualifications, according to new research.

The Higher Education Degree Datacheck (HEDD), which conducted the study, said that most degree fraud goes undetected because businesses do not make proper checks.

Employers 'fail to check proof of degree'
Employers 'fail to check proof of degree' Credit: PA

The latest study, which questioned 106 employers, found that fewer than two thirds (62%) said that they request degree certificates or transcripts from at least some candidates, with a third (33%) saying that they do not do so.

Less than a fifth (19%) revealed that they check certificates and transcripts with the university than issued them, with the vast majority (76%) admitting that they do not verify documents. HEDD director Jayne Rowley said:

Many of us want to believe that people are telling the truth, so we place our trust in references, applications and interviews. With a low perception of the frequency and risks of qualification fraud it's easy to become complacent. But some people are unscrupulous and looking to take advantage.

If someone is lying about their qualifications, we have to question their overall integrity as a potential employee.

– Jayne Rowley, Higher Education Degree Datacheck

Labour left Britain 'with a broken energy market'

The Conservatives have accused Labour of bringing Britain's economy to its knees, after it announced proposals to revoke energy companies' licences helping protect the interests of the public. A Conservative Party spokesman said:

Labour left our country with a broken energy market and huge taxes on bills - meaning the number of people in fuel poverty nearly doubled in Labour's last five years.

We've been taking action to put this right. We've taken £50 off the average bill by rolling back green levies. We're carrying out a full, independent inquiry to fix the broken market we inherited. And we're forcing energy companies to simplify bills so people can be sure they are getting the best deal.

– Spokesman, Conservatives
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