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Harriet Green credited with reviving Thomas Cook

Harriet Green is leaving the company after being in charge since July 2012. Credit: Thomas Cook/PA Wire

Thomas Cook's Chief Executive Harriet Green is leaving the company after turning around its fortunes from when she joined over two years ago.

Under Ms Green's leadership the company cut costs through the closure of shops, as well as through the sale of hotels and reduction in its airline fleet.

  • Harriet Green joined the Company as Group Chief Executive Officer on 30 July 2012
  • Prior to joining Thomas Cook she was Chief Executive Officer of leading high service technology distributor Premier Farnell plc
  • Ms Green was named “Leader of the Year 2013” in the National Business Awards
  • She will continue to act as Thomas Cook's Group Director until 31 December 2014.
  • Ms Green is also a member of the PM’s Business Advisory Group

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Cameron admits NHS is under pressure

Prime Minister David Cameron today admitted the NHS is "under pressure."

During PMQs, Labour leader Ed Miliband criticised Cameron for running down the health service and claimed the situation could only be changed if he was elected as prime minister in the next election.

Cameron admitted the service was dealing with more patients each day than under the last Government but said the Conservatives were the only party which could "run a strong economy to pay for a strong NHS."

Only five out of 92 beds in use at Brit-funded Ebola unit

Beds in the £2 million Ebola unit are empty despite opening three weeks ago. Credit: MoD

Only five out of 92 beds are in use at a British-funded Ebola hospital in Sierra Leone which opened three weeks ago.

The facility in Kerry Town cost £2 million to build and is being run by charity Save the Children.

But Tory MP Sir Edward Garnier flagged up his concerns about its use during Prime Minister's Question's.

He told the Prime Minister: "As of last night, it was looking after five patients.

"Would you have a word with (International Development Secretary Justine Greening) and others in Government to make sure that hospital is made proper use of?"

Mr Cameron agreed and said the government was working "intensively" with Save the Children to ensure the hospital reaches its full capacity.

So far more than 5,000 people in West Africa have died from the deadly virus and thousands more have been infected.

Read more: British-funded Ebola treatment centre opens in Sierra Leone

Michael Brown's mother: Officer's comments 'insulting'

The mother of US teen Michael Brown says comments made by the police officer who killed her son have added "insult after injury".

Lesley McSpadden, Brown's mother, told NBC's Today show that officer Darren Wilson had been "disrespectful" by saying that her son looked like a "demon" before the shooting.

Brown's father, Michael Brown Snr, said Wilson's account of the incident was "crazy".

"Who in their right mind would rush or charge at a police officer that has his gun drawn?" he asked.

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Footballer accused of trying to smuggle woman

Gervinho has been accused of trying to smuggle someone into Italy. Credit: PA

Former Arsenal forward Gervinho has been accused of trying to smuggle a woman onto a flight from the Ivory Coast to Rome.

Gervinho was leaving the Ivorian capital of Abidjan last week on a private jet laid on by his club, Roma, after helping Ivory Coat qualify for next year's Africa Cup of Nations in Equatorial Guinea.

According to French publication imatin, he managed to bribe several airport officials before being rumbled by the pilot, who refused to depart with the woman on board.

Gervinho's agent Pascal Boisseau was unavailable for comment.

New terror laws 'nothing as dramatic' as proposed

New measures include confiscating passports. Credit: PA

New anti-terror laws are "nothing like as dramatic" as proposed earlier this year, the reviewer of terror legislation has said.

David Anderson QC claimed some of the powers to stop British jihadists returning from Iraq and Syria were ill-thought out and would not work in practice.

He told the Joint Committee on Human Rights: "My understanding is that somebody who is seeking to fly home may be presented with an order at the check-in desk and told 'you are more than welcome to come home.'

"But when you come home you will have to comply with certain obligations' and those are the obligations in the order.

"Now, no doubt there will be cases about whether that is lawful, but certainly in terms of restricting the right of abode, it is nothing like as dramatic as what appeared to be originally proposed."

Home Secretary Theresa May will publish the details of the measures later in a new Counter-terrorism and Security Bill.

  1. Wales

Ex-children's home boss guilty of 26 sex abuse charges

Former North Wales children's home owner John Allen has been found guilty of 26 counts of sexually abusing youngsters.

He was found not guilty of two counts by a jury at Mold Crown Court.

12 counts are still to be decided.

Mr Allen, 73, ran homes in the Wrexham area known as the Bryn Alyn Community.

In a seven-week trial, he denied all 40 counts of sexual abuse against 20 children, aged between seven and 15, from 1968 to 1991.

John Allen owned and ran a group of children's homes in the Wrexham area. Credit: PA
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