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Ebola alert at Birmingham airport as man tested for deadly virus

Birmingham Airport
Birmingham Airport Credit: BRUNO FAHY/Belga/Press Association Images

A man has been tested for the deadly virus Ebola after flying into Birmingham Airport from Nigeria.

He was taken to hospital by ambulance on Monday ( 28th July) as a precautionary measure after complaining of feeling feverish when leaving the plane which had travelled from Benin via Paris.

Protecting the public from infectious diseases is a priority and we lead the world in this field. We are well-prepared to identify and deal with any potential cases of Ebola, though there has never been a case in this country.

Any patients with suspected symptoms can be diagnosed within 24 hours and they would also be isolated at a dedicated unit to keep the public safe. Our specialist staff are also working with the World Health organisation to help tackle the outbreak in Africa.”

– The Department of Health

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Firms to face penalties for poor service

Energy distribution companies will face financial penalties if they fail to put in place measures to help vulnerable customers, the energy regulator has said.

"Our annual customer satisfaction survey focuses companies’ attention on this important area and poor performers will face financial penalties," Ofegem said.

It comes alongside plans to make companies invest in maintaining and upgrading the local electricity network.

Ofgem has also brought in stricter targets for firms to make sure new customers such as businesses and housing developments can get connected to the network more quickly.

Read: Energy price controls to save households £12 a year

Usain Bolt accused of calling Glasgow 2014 'a bit s***'

Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt risked the wrath of Glasgow after reportedly saying that the Commonwealth Games in the city were "a bit s***".

Usain Bolt was reportedly unimpressed with Glasgow 2014.
Usain Bolt was reportedly unimpressed with Glasgow 2014. Credit: Reuters

According to the Times, the world record-holding runner said he was "not really" having fun in Scotland and thought "the Olympics were better".

Earlier, Bolt had tweeted following his meeting with the Royals, saying it was "honourable" meeting with Prince Harry.

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Israel: Hamas fighters hiding weapons in mosques

Israel's military claims Hamas fighters in Gaza have been concealing weapons and entrances to tunnels underneath five mosques, which it says were targeted overnight.

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Terrorists in Gaza used 5 mosques to hide weapons and house tunnel access shafts. Our aircraft targeted these sites overnight.

Energy price controls to save households £12 a year

Households will see an average of £12 a year come off their bill under price control plans for the companies that run Britain's local electricity network.

Energy network companies will have to pay £17bn to upgrade and maintain the network under proposals put forward by industry regulator Ofgem.

Companies will have to spend £17bn to maintain and upgrade the energy network.
Companies will have to spend £17bn to maintain and upgrade the energy network. Credit: Chris Ison/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Ofgem sets price controls for the companies to limit the amount they can collect from customers' bills and incentivise them to improve their services.

The regulator rejected price control plans from five of the six energy distribution companies, saying they did not represent value for money for consumers.

Read: Energy customers to get extra storm compensation

Energy companies to make improvements 'for £12 less'

Energy providers will have to improve their services by "£12 a year less" than they normally would and then pass those savings on to consumers, OfGem have announced.

Speaking on Good Morning Britain OfGem's Maxine Frerk, said the changes should come into force "from next April" and savings "should flow into customer's bills from that point".

Bank of England plan to 'claw back bankers' bonuses'

Misbehaving bankers could be forced to repay bonuses from previous years under plans set to be unveiled by the Bank of England, according to the BBC.

Bankers in London's financial hub could have to repay bonuses from previous years.
Bankers in London's financial hub could have to repay bonuses from previous years. Credit: Chris Radburn for Glasgow 2014

It could mean bonuses paid out as long as seven years ago being returned, even if they were paid in shares and have already been cashed and spent.

The BoE had already warned in March that bankers could face clawbacks for "misbehaviour", including if their bank registered big losses.

Reports at the time suggested bonuses from up to six years ago would be at risk, though that appears to have been extended to seven years.

Another previous suggestion had been to cancel promised bonuses, but the Bank's position appears to have hardened.

Read: Bank bosses to face shareholder fury

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