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Day-night matches a proper test says Essex star Westley

Tom Westley: It'll take some getting used to Credit: PA

England and Essex batsman Tom Westley says it will take time to get used to the new day-night Test matches .

Edgbaston hosted a first day-night Test with the West Indies, which England won by an innings and 209 runs inside three days. The event was deemed to have been a success, with Friday's attendance of 23,922 the best for a non-Ashes Test since 2001. And they better get used to it quickly as England will take on Australia under the lights for the second Ashes Test at the Adelaide Oval in December, and there have been suggestions a day-night Test could yet become a permanent fixture in home matches going forwards.

Tom Westley, who played club cricket at Mildenhall, managed only eight runs in the first Test, out lbw to Miguel Cummins on review. In a column for Sky Sports he said the new format will take some getting used to on both sides of the crease.

"The day-night Test was a brilliant spectacle, something I will remember for a very long time, playing in the first one ever in England. However, it did feel a bit like an experiment at times. No one quite knew how the pink ball was going to behave, what it would be like batting and fielding under floodlights. There were elements of the unknown, which isn't ideal. Having said all that, it was an amazing experience. The atmosphere, in particular, was fantastic."

– Tom Westley

England continue the Investec Test Series against the West Indies at Headingley on Friday

Suffolk's Rural Coffee Caravan back in action

Do you remember the story of the Rural Coffee Caravan which was stolen in Suffolk leaving lots of isolated people in the lurch.

Today, the tale finally got a happy ending - thanks to an impressive fundraising campaign.

Just a few weeks after the theft, the volunteers have a replacement caravan which has once again been on the road visiting villages around the county.

Malcolm Robertson went to see it back in action - watch his report for ITV News Anglia above.

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Police investigating Luton sexual assault want to speak to this man

Do you recognise this man? Bedfordshire Police want to speak to him. Credit: Bedfordshire Police.

Police want to speak to this man following an alleged sexual assault in Luton.

A woman was walking along the underpass at New Bedford Road at about 9.10am on Wednesday July 19 when she was approached by a man.

He sexually assaulted her but left the scene when she challenged him.

“We’re releasing a CCTV image of a man we would like to speak to in connection with this incident and I would urge anyone who could help us identify the man, as well as anyone who witnessed the incident or who has information that could help, to get in touch.”

– PC Matt Watson, Bedfordshire Police.

Armed police search for man in Norwich seen with a crossbow

Police in Norwich are searching for a man with a crossbow - like this one. Credit: Press Association Images.

Armed police are out in Norwich searching for man seen assembling a crossbow in the city.

Norfolk Police confirmed they had deployed officers to Fye Bridge Street at about 11.20am today (Wednesday August 23) "following reports a man had been seen to assemble what appeared to be a crossbow".

A spokesman added: "Searches are ongoing to locate the man but there is not believed to be any wider threat to the public at this stage."

'He was racist' - Guardian columnist defends call to tear down Nelson's Column

Guardian columnist Afua Hirsch has defended her claim that Nelson's Column should be pulled down - because he was a "white supremacist".

The writer has faced strong criticism since the opinion piece was published in the national newspaper.

But she stands by her views -

"I'm not going to tell people what they should think of Nelson but I would like them to be aware of the fact that he was very comfortable with slavery.

"He would have looked at someone like me as an inferior human being, even at a time when his contemporaries wouldn't have accepted that.

"He was racist."

– Afua Hirsch, The Guardian columnist.
Lord Nelson, at the top of his column in Trafalgar Square. Credit: Press Association Images.
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