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Top ten most popular pet names of 2016

2016's top 10 dog names.

Traditional pet names are the most popular for Britain’s dogs and cats, a new RSPCA survey has revealed.

More than 1,200 people were surveyed by the animal welfare charity to discover what pet owners choose to name their dogs and cats, with results showing that the same pet names are still being chosen compared to six years ago.

In 2016, Ben or Benjamin was the most popular name for a male dog - with Max and Alfie in second and third, respectively - while Poppy was the most popular name for a bitch, closely followed by Daisy in second and Maisie in third.

Six years ago, in 2010, a similar survey also saw Ben come in at the top with Max in second while Bonnie was the most popular name for females. Sam and Jack were also in the top 10 for males while Poppy and Rosie were also included. Toby, Ellie and Meg have dropped off the lists this year, however.

In 2016, the most popular name for male cats was Bob with Charlie in second spot and Smokey in third. Bella was the most popular name for female felines, while Molly came in second and Jess in third.

The 2010 survey saw Tigger or Tiger take the top spot which in 2016 failed to make the list. Charlie came in second six years ago - the same as today - and Misty took third, but has since dropped off the list completely. Tom, Smokey, Poppy, Sam and Sooty are all still popular today but Harriet and Blackie have disappeared from the list.

2016's top cat names.

Bob could be popular among cat owners due to the popularity of the book and film, A Street Cat Called Bob, while dog names such as Alfie have surged in popularity not just among pet owners but also parents.

In fact, if you compare these lists with the 2016 list of the most popular baby names there is some crossover. Jack, Charlie and Bella - or Isabella - all make the top 10 lists for baby names and pet names.

But there are some important things to think about when choosing a name for your pet such as keeping names short, avoiding any that sound like a behaviour you will want your dog to do or are similar to the names of anyone else in the home.

– Lisa Richards, RSPCA animal welfare expert