Advertisement

  1. ITV Report

'There isn't any sense behind what's happened. It's a real tragedy,' says teacher of teenagers

Kyle Warren, Dominic O'Neill and Billy Hines (l-r) were killed in a crash on Wednesday. Credit: Facebook

The deputy headteacher of two teenagers killed in a fatal crash this week said the community was struggling to make sense of the tragedy.

Kyle Warren, Dominic O'Neill and Billy Hines were killed late on Wednesday when the car they were travelling in left the A140 and struck a tree.

Two of the teenagers, Kyle and Dominic, had attended Archbishop Sancroft High School in Harleston, near Diss.

Today, their deputy headteacher Rob Connelly spoke fondly of the young men who he said 'would light up a room'.

"They were full of energy. They would have always been doing something with a smile on their faces.

"They had a real passion and a thirst for life. It's saddening to know that that's been cut short. I have such fond memories of working with the boys."

– Rob Connelly, deputy headteacher, Archbishop Sancroft High School.
Dominic O'Neill was a talented drummer. Credit: Facebook.

The teacher said Dominic and Kyle had been "characters" and admitted he had got to know them very well because some times they had needed support and "a reminder of what expectations were".

But he said they had worked hard to make sure they had the best opportunities when they left school and "had a real future ahead of them"

Remembering two well-liked students - talented musician Dominic and promising mechanic Kyle - he urged friends and family to "hold on to the memories they had".

At the same time as dealing with their own shock, teachers at the school have also had to focus on supporting pupils over the last two days.

Although admitting "there isn't any sense behind what's happened", Mr Connelly said he hoped they could help students move forward.

Kyle Warren was a successful slot-car racer. Credit: Facebook.

"We've worked incredibly hard with the local community, the church, the diocese, the local authority, to really try to support everybody who has been affected.

"We are so small, we know everybody. Everybody knows everybody in Harleston and Pulham. We've really tried to offer some space and some support and an opportunity for people to get away from what's going on out there, share, and make some sense of how we move forward from this point."

– Rob Connelly, deputy headteacher, Archbishop Sancroft High School.
Billy Hines. The community where all three teenagers lived are struggling to make sense of the tragedy. Credit: Facebook.

A lantern release has also taken place in memories of the three teenagers. Watch Kate Prout's report below.

More on this story