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Hertfordshire father completes gruelling Tour de France challenge 60's style

The Tour de France is a true test of endurance, but back in 1968 is was longer in both distance and duration than the current version.

Will Jackson-Moore has completed the 60's version of the race in 24 days all to raise money for Cancer Research UK and Harrison's fund to fight Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Will Jackson-Moore Credit: ITV Anglia

Will was bitten by the cycling bug at a young age. He lives near Hemel Hempstead and, along with three friends, marked his fiftieth birthday by taking on the gruelling Tour de France route from fifty years ago.

"We were thinking of maybe doing this year's Tour de France route. And somebody said 'Why don't you do the Tour de France from the year that you were born?' So hence that's how it all came together."

– Will Jackson-Moore
Will and his colleagues on the Tour Credit: Will Jackson-Moore

The 1968 route is:

  • More than 4,600 kilometres
  • Twenty four days
  • Climbs measuring more than fifty thousand metres.
  • 1,100 kilometres longer than the Tour route of 2017

"We've all done long individual days. 200, 250, even 300 kilometre days. But to actually do this every single day, 250 kilometres, finish at nine o'clock at night, knowing that you're getting up but going on to do it the next day but maybe for the next five days in a row before a rest day."

– Will Jackson-Moore
Will and his colleagues on the Tour Credit: Will Jackson-Moore

"Seeing all the vehicles and the banners, this was a pretty big deal. Whilst there were only four of us doing the whole thing, we had twenty-two different people coming along to do individual stages with us. We had a support team which varied between two and four people on individual days, Every day different city, different start, different finish. Yes we were a rolling circus going around France."

– Will Jackson-Moore

Will was meticulous in his planning. All details of the route listed in what he called the Tour Bible. A constant reminder of what was achieved, plus a few mementoes.

The quartet set out to raise fifty thousand pounds for two charities. Cancer Research UK and Harrison's fund to fight Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

"Harrison is my cousin's son. and it's a really tough disease. It's a 100% fatality rate for the boys that get it. It's one of those diseases where research is making progress, so we really wanted to do something to support them."

– Will Jackson-Moore

Click below to watch our report from Donovan Blake

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