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University of Cambridge rated as the joint-second best university in the world

The University of Cambridge. Credit: PA

The University of Cambridge has been ranked as the joint-second best university in the world, according to the latest QS World University Rankings.

Four of the top ten universities are now based in the UK, with Cambridge sharing second spot with Imperial College London.

The University of Cambridge was rated as the third best university in last year's league table.

The rankings cover a number of factors, including graduate employment and teaching standards.

QS World University Rankings 2014

  • 1.) Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA)
  • 2.) University of Cambridge (UK)
  • 2.) Imperial College London (UK)
  • 4.) Harvard University (USA)
  • 5.) University of Oxford (UK)
  • 5.) University College London (UK)
  • 7.) Stanford University (USA)
  • 8.) California Institute of Technology (USA)
  • 9.) Princeton University (USA)
  • 10.) Yale University (USA)

Suffolk couple who lost their son to Meningitis raise awareness of symptoms

Caroline and Adrian Grove's son Cayden was just 20 days old when he fell ill in 2008.

A couple from Suffolk who lost their son to Meningitis are trying to raise awareness of the symptoms.

Caroline and Adrian Grove's son Cayden was just 20 days old when he fell ill in 2008 - but he was not diagnosed until it was too late, two days later he died.

They are supporting meningitis awareness week.

"Our son Cayden had late onset GBS, meningitis and septicaemia in 2008. He first showed signs of illness at 20 days old. He was cold, pale, panting and being sick after feeds. He was also very grumpy during the day, with a high pitched cry. We never knew these were signs of infection and the hospital staff didn't pick up on it (staying on SCBU due to prematurity). He crashed and the doctors gave him lots of medication to control blood pressure and ventilator. He was transferred the next day to a NICU in a bigger hospital. There the doctors found him to be unresponsive to touch, his eyes were not moving, he was not breathing for himself and the doctors felt that he was too poorly to recover. A scan the following day confirmed that he had severe brain damage and we removed life support. He passed away very quickly."

– Caroline and Adrian Grove.

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An academic and student revolution 50 years on

The University of Essex is celebrating its 50th anniversary. 120 students started at the site near Colchester back in 1964. Since then the campus has expanded and 70,000 from more than 130 countries have graduated.

This past weekend alumni returned to their old haunt to reminisce.

Through the 1970s Essex University hit the headlines for its revolutionary students and protests. It also made news for its pioneering research in social sciences.

ITV News Anglia's Tanya Mercer reports

The wartime secrets of the mysterious Langham Dome

What wartime secrets were kept in the mysterious Langham dome? Credit: ITV News Anglia

It's a curious building perched closed to the North Norfolk coast but it played a vital role in the Second World War.

The Langham Dome just a new miles from Blakeney hid a secret that helped Britain deal with the aerial bombardment from Germany.

It's now been restored and turned into a museum where its mystery can now be revealed.

Kate Prout reports on the Langham Dome in the ITV News Anglia Hidden Histories series

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World Cup 1966 & the East

The East of England may not have hosted any of the 31 fixtures staged during the 1966 World Cup, but there was still a role to play for the region.

A handful of nations, including semi-finalists Portugal and finalists West Germany, based themselves in the ITV Anglia patch.

Portugal stayed at Harlow, while the Homestead Court Hotel in Welwyn Garden City was used by the Germans although they trained in Stevenage in the run up to the final.

See Donovan Blake's report, part of ITV News Anglia's series "Hidden Histories"

Council abandons prosecution of couple over term-time school holiday

James and Dana Haymore arriving at Colchester Magistrates' Court in July. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Essex County Council has withdrawn a legal case against a couple for taking their child out of school during term-time for a family visit.

James and Dana Haymore pleaded not guilty to a charge of failing to ensure their child attends school when they were summoned to Colchester Magistrates' Court in July.

The family took one of their three children out of Chancellor Park Primary School in Chelmsford for a trip to America for a memorial service. The family has now emigrated to the United States.

Cllr Ray Gooding, Cabinet member for Education and Lifelong Learning at Essex County Council, said: “We have had to take a decision based on the public interest of pursuing a case where the family have emigrated and are no longer being educated in an Essex school.

“This is an unusual situation but we have chosen to be pragmatic and accept that continuing with the prosecution serves little purpose and will cost the council money. We take unauthorised absence very seriously and support the principle of the Government’s strengthening of the rules in September 2013, which meant that term-time absence had to be authorised by head teachers and only in exceptional circumstances. It is extremely important to remember that in this case, the school followed the policy to the letter.”

– Cllr Ray Gooding, Essex County Council

Bletchley code-breaking machine to be used in school history lessons

The World War Two Enigma code-breaking machine. Credit: ITV News Anglia

The World War Two Enigma code-breaking machine at Bletchley Park is among a hundred artefacts chosen to reinvigorate school history lessons.

The British Museum has compiled the list to encourage school visits and bring history books to life by focussing on objects that played a crucial part in the shaping of our nation.

Also listed is the Sutton Hoo helmet in Suffolk, the Early Iron Age boat, Vivacity, in Peterborough and a chest belonging to the anti-slavery campaigner, Thomas Clarkson in Wisbech.

"I think it's a brilliant thing to happen for Bletchley Park and for all the children in all the schools in the country.

We already think that Enigma machines are a brilliant way of teaching children about maths and history and this is going to highlight that for us."

– Vicky Worpole, Bletchley Park
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