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Cambridgeshire needs thousands of new homes

Government planning inspectors say 43,000 new homes are needed in Cambridge and South Cambridgeshire over 16 years.

They have called for local councils to reconsider their current strategy of creating new towns and villages to tackle the shortage of affordable homes.

Thousands of new homes are needed Credit: PA

Instead they suggest building more houses on the edge of the city because this may be more sustainable.

The local plan document plots delivery of 33,000 new homes and 43,000 jobs until 2031, as 'Greater Cambridge' faces an enormous period of growth.

New habitat for wildlife to be created

The orange tip butterfly can be seen at Fingringhoe Wick in spring Credit: PA

Twenty two hectares of intertidal habitat for plants and wildlife will be created at Fingringhoe near Colchester.

The Environment Agency and Essex Wildlife Trust are working together to breach the existing sea wall, allowing land to flood and creating salt marshes for wildlife to thrive.

"Within a year we will have salt marsh plants colonising the site and on the first tide the waders and wildfowl will come in on the water and be a great new reserve and an extension to the existing one ."

– Merle Leeds, Environment Agency
The Great Crested Grebe is among the species in the area Credit: PA

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Work to begin on Essex sea wall

New Wetland on the Colne Estuary. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Part of the Essex seawall is being removed, to help create more than 50 acres of new wetland on the Colne Estuary.

The Environment Agency hopes the new habitat of saltmarsh, mudflats and reedbeds will provide breeding ground for rare species of birds, fish and insects.

The Essex Wildlife Trust raised £125,000 to buy the land.

"We're delighted to be involved in this partnership with Essex Wildlife Trust, and so pleased that our workforce is playing such a huge part in creating this new internationally important habitat."

– Charles Beardall, Area Manager for the Environment Agency

Students head to Holland with their 'eco car'

Students from the College of West Anglia with their 'eco car' Credit: ITV News Anglia

Students from the College of West Anglia in King's Lynn are heading to Holland today to show off their new eco car.

They were challenged to build a car that will go the furthest on one litre of fuel. They'll battle against 3000 students from across Europe.

'Eco car' designed by students Credit: ITV News Anglia

"We hope to double the miles per hour we got last year and we're hoping that the changes that we made will allow us to do that. So new body work, new engine system, hopefully that will all add up to the goal we're aiming for"

– Tyler Griffin and Sam Fletcher, engineering students

Emergency laws introduced to prevent overfishing of whelks

Emergency laws have been brought in around the region's coast to prevent the over-fishing of whelks.

There's been an increased demand for them recently from Asia. Exports are estimated to be around £14 million.

But until now there has been nothing to prevent over-fishing of whelks and their numbers have fallen dramatically.

Now the Inshore Fishing Authority insists permits are needed to prevent the industry collapsing.

Click below to watch a report from ITV News Anglia's Tanya Mercer

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Hard-hitting report claims Cambridge river is being damaged by "indecisive intellectuals"

A hard-hitting report claims the future of the River Cam in Cambridge is under threat because of the way it's managed.

It doesn't hold back - saying that the waterway is being damaged by "indecisive intellectuals and waffling academics".

The report is called 'The Cam River Matters' and sets out 13 top threats including pollution, illegal mooring and congestion.

Click below to watch a report from ITV News Anglia's Matthew Hudson

Cambridge river under threat from "indecisive intellectuals and waffling academics"

The River Cam in Cambridge. Credit: ITV News Anglia

A new report out today is claiming the future of the River Cam in Cambridge is under threat because of the way it's managed.

A document called 'The Cam River Matters' sets out 13 top threats, including pollution, illegal mooring and congestion.

The report says that the river could be managed better. Credit: ITV News Anglia

But the report also says its future is being damaged by "indecisive intellectuals and waffling academics"- who it says are failing to make key decisions around the growth of the city.

"At the moment what we've got is serious symptoms, but the river is fantastic.

The upper river is unbelievable, you can still swim in it. If you are rowing when somebody else isn't rowing it's perfect, but it won't last."

– Mal Schofield, Report author

Emergency by-law introduced to prevent overfishing of Whelks

An emergency by-law has been introduced around the region's coast. Credit: ITV News Anglia

An emergency by-law has been introduced around the region's coast to prevent overfishing of whelks.

There's been an increased demand for the molluscs recently from Asian markets and export for the industry is estimated to be around £14 million.

There's been an increased demand for whelks from Asian markets. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Until now there has been nothing to prevent overfishing and their numbers have fallen dramatically.

Now the Inshore Fishing Authority insists permits are needed to prevent the industry collapsing.

"The objective of the by-law is to protect the stock and maintain a sustainable fishery in whelk in the district.

We've seen cats per unit effort decrease significantly over the last 12 months and the authority judge said that if we didn't take management measures there's a danger that the fishery would collapse".

– Julian Gregory, Eastern Inshore Fisheries & Conservation Authority

Antarctic ice shelves are thinning from rising temperatures say Cambridge scientists

The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest warming regions on Earth Credit: British Antarctic Survey

Scientists from Cambridge claim to have settled a debate about what's causing the thinning of one of Antarctica's largest ice shelves.

The team from the British Antarctic survey say that the shelf is being melted by rising ocean temperatures and increasing atmospheric temperature.

The mean annual temperatures in this region have risen by 2.5°C during the last 50 years Credit: British Antarctic Survey

They say the research could help explain the impact of future sea level rises.

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