Live updates

Advertisement

Cambridgeshire farmer beating the 'Fen blow'

Video report by ITV News Anglia's Stuart Leithes.

A Cambridgeshire farmer is leading the way in a form of land use known as "agro-forestry" - where crops and trees are grown in the same field.

Stephen Briggs and wife Lynn can pick apples as they inspect the crops Credit: ITV News Anglia

Stephen Briggs has grown rows of apple trees in his other crops, like oats and wheat, which means he gets two different harvests to sell.

The trees help to stop soil erosion - which is a big problem in the Fenland fields.

Advertisement

Campaign for conservation zone at Hunstanton

A seal enjoying The Wash Approach. Credit: ITV Anglia

Hunstanton Sea Life Sanctuary have launched a campaign to make The Wash Approach a special conservation zone.

They say the area of sandbanks, gravel and worm reefs provide a rich feeding ground for a huge variety of animals and sealife including seals and porpoises.

They're asking visitors to sign postcards backing their calls for the protected status.

"If successful it would be strong reassurance that the environment we are returning all those seals to is secure for the foreseeable future, and a safe healthy habitat both for them and the diverse other marine life it supports."

– Kieran Copeland, Displays Supervisor

'Too ugly' for supermarket lemons saved by Peterborough farm

Six tonnes of organic lemons were deemed ‘unsuitable to meet retailer specification based on appearance’. Credit: Riverford Farmers

An organic farming group based in Peterborough are warning of the impact of supermarkets wasting food.

Riverford have bought six tonnes of lemons that were deemed unsuitable due to their appearance.

Around a third of the food we produce worldwide ends up in the bin.

Our customers love knowing exactly where the food on their plate has come from- we can tell them who grew it, how they grew it, and when it was picked.

This connection means they enjoy getting unusual shaped veg that has been grown for flavour, not cosmetic perfection, and having the reassurance that our farmers are paid fairly for their produce, even if it is not aesthetically perfect.

– James Negus, Riverford
Load more updates