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UEA scientists research rainfall in India in hope they can predict monsoons

The underwater robot Credit: University of East Anglia

Scientists in Norwich have travelled to India to help with a project that can predict monsoon rainfall there.

Researchers at the University of East Anglia will be using underwater robots in the Bay of Bengal to monitor how ocean conditions influence the climate.

It's hoped the £8 million project will help forecast the rains more accurately and so reduce any damage caused.

The robot will be used to monitor conditions underwater Credit: University of East Anglia

"The Indian monsoon is notoriously hard to predict. It is a very complicated weather system and the processes are not understood or recorded in science. We will be combining oceanic and atmospheric measurements to monitor weather systems as they are generated. Nobody has ever made observations on this scale during the monsoon season itself so this is a truly ground-breaking project."

– Lead researcher, Prof Adrian Matthews, UEA

The project is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, the Newton Fund, the Indian Ministry of Earth Sciences and the UK's Met Office.

8 ft sinkhole opens up in Norfolk

A sinkhole has opened up in Earls Street, Thetford Credit: ITV News Anglia

Engineers are investigating after an 8-foot deep sinkhole opened up in Norfolk last night, causing part of a garden wall to collapse.

It caused two walls to collapse and a double garden gate has been taken down by the hole Credit: ITV News Anglia

Fire crews were called to Earl Street, in Thetford just after 6.30pm.

The hole is around 8ft deep and took down a fence gate, part of a wall and some paving as it opened.

The hole is around 15ft by 10ft and around 8ft deep Credit: ITV News Anglia

Officers have taped off the area, but Norfolk County Council's says it's still trying to find out what caused the sinkhole.

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Seeing red! The farmer who ended up with a surprise field of poppies

Video report by ITV News Anglia's Stuart Leithes.

A field full of poppies is a spectacular sight - and one which could be thought of as a gesture of remembrance.

The farm is next to the A505 near Royston. Credit: ITV News Anglia

But at a farm near Royston in Hertfordshire say they're not too happy with the poppies that have grown in one of their fields - because it's not the crop they planted.

The 60 acre field should be filled with blue linseed, but because the sprays didn't work, poppies grew instead.

Council reject calls for a referendum to build waste incinerator in Northampton

Video report by ITV News Anglia's Matthew Hudson.

Campaigners in Northampton say they're angry the county council has rejected calls for a referendum on building a huge waste incinerator in the town.

Green campaigners say the site will release pollutants

Plans for the development in the St James area of the town are expected to be submitted. But many locals say the plant, which would extract energy from refuse, would be a health hazard and pollute the town.

Record number of wetwipes washing up on beaches

Around '50 wipes' are found for every kilometre of coastline Credit: ITV Anglia.

There has been a 400% rise in the number of wet wipes washing up on our beaches in the last ten years.

The Marine Conservation Society says around 50 wipes are found for every kilometre of coastline because too many people flush them down the toilet instead of throw them away.

They have now launched a campaign to persuade retailers and manufacturers to clearly label their wet wipe products with a 'DON'T FLUSH' message.

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UEA scientists to work on £8m project to predict monsoons

Researchers will be using underwater robots to monitor ocean conditions. Credit: UEA

Scientists in Norwich are heading to India this morning to help with a project that can predict monsoon rainfall there.

Researchers at the UEA will be using underwater robots in the Bay of Bengal to monitor how ocean conditions influence the climate.

It's hoped the £8 million project will help forecast the rains more accurately, and so reduce any damage caused.

Asparagus farmers race to harvest crop

Credit: PA Images

Asparagus farmers in the region are racing to harvest their crop at the moment.

The limited picking season had been delayed because of the cold weather earlier this year - but the recent warm spell has ripened it and supermarkets are about to be inundated with abundant supplies.

Meet seaside resort's latest attraction - the grazing goats

Forget the Victorian pier, stunning beach and fishing boats hauled up on the shingle, Cromer in Norfolk has added a new must-see sight for visitors to the seaside town - goats.

Eight Bagot billy goats have been brought in to graze an area of the cliff and stop it getting overgrown.

North Norfolk District Council says the new "habitat management project" will keep unwanted plant species under control.

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