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  1. Kate Prout

Farewell to a sperm whale that died on the Norfolk coast

The cost of removing a dead sperm whale from the beach at Hunstanton is costing the local council thousands of pounds.

Workmen using chainsaws, a digger and lots of skips, removed the 30 tonne carcass from where it washed up a week ago.

The remains have been taken to an animal incinerator facility outside of the county. Four other whales, washed up in Lincolnshire, have also been disposed of.

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Three fly-tipping incidents in Essex are linked

A133 bypass heading out o Clacton Credit: Tendring District Council

Tendring District Council says that three fly-tipping incidents they are investigating are linked.

The council says it received complaints about waste being dumped in a lay-by on the A133 bypass, on Colchester Road in St Osyth and the Green off Rush Green Road in Clacton.

Colchester Road, St Osyth Credit: Tendring District Council

"We would ask anyone who has had some work done at their home or in their garden in the last day or so to contact us if they believe the waste may have come from there,” he said. “We would also like to hear from anyone who may have seen a vehicle in any of the areas mentioned over the time period and it may have looked suspicious.”

– Cllr Michael Talbot, Cabinet Member for Environment
The Green, Rush Green Road, Clacton Credit: Tendring District Council

The maximum fine for fly-tipping is £50,000.

Could air pollution in Cambridge be worse than New York?

Is air pollution in Cambridge as bad as it is in New York City?

Environmental campaigners in Cambridge say pollution levels in the city are evidence that a congestion charge, similar to that in London, must be brought in at the earliest opportunity.

The Green Party claims it's necessary after figures one day last week showed air quality was below that of New York.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge say we shouldn't worry too much because the very high readings were most likely caused by a particular set of weather conditions.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Russell Hookey

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Sightseers urged to keep their distance from dead whale

The public are being urged to stay away from a dead sperm whale on Hunstanton beach. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Experts are trying to find out why a pod of sperm whales have washed dead up along the East Coast.

Thousands are flocking to West Norfolk to see the corpse of one giant animal beached on the rocks, while others have come ashore in Lincolnshire.

Council staff are urging people to keep their distance from the whale stranded on the beach at Hunstanton while they work to dispose of it.

The first whale washed up on the beach at Hunstanton on Friday afternoon. Two more were found on the beach at Skegness on Saturday evening and another washed up on Sunday morning. A fifth was found on the same coastline on Monday. It's still not known why the animals died

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Stuart Leithes

Buses could be forced to change routes if they fail to cut pollution

Bus companies could be forced to change their routes in Colchester if they don't reduce exhaust fumes. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Bus companies could be forced to change their routes in Colchester if they don't reduce emissions coming from their vehicles.

It's estimated that pollution is responsible for more than a hundred premature deaths in the town each year.

Colchester Borough Council has put forward proposals to introduce a clean air zone to tackle the problem.

Click below to watch a video report by ITV News Anglia's Victoria Lampard

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