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Norwich: UEA experts lead new research into dementia treatment

Dr Chris Fox. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Experts from the University of East Anglia say leading new research into the way people with dementia are treated in hospitals could help provide a more consistent level of care.

Dr Chris Fox from the university is leading a five-year study which began last year.

When completed, it could set guidelines for training staff as well as giving patients and their families a clearer idea of what care to expect.

The research is being carried out in a number of hospitals, including the Norfolk and Norwich, Ipswich and the James Paget hospital.

"I see it as a way of the care giver, the family, the patients and professionals having a plan.

The idea in the enhanced recovery pathway is that you know everyday or by day five what to expect.

You know where you will be, so it will have that sort of timetable."

– Dr Chris Fox, UEA

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Colchester MP Sir Bob Russell delighted after "internal major incident" is lifted

Sir Bob Russell. Credit: PA

Colchester MP Sir Bob Russell has expressed his delight that the "internal major incident" at Colchester Hospital has been lifted.

The hospital has returned to "normal working" following a period where staff struggled to cope with unprecedented demand.

“This has clearly been a very worrying time for all associated with the Hospital, staff and patients, as well as residents throughout our part of Essex.

I am delighted that the prompt action taken has led to this outcome, although I recognise this has been at the expense in particular of cancelled operations which I hope can be speedily reinstated. We are, of course, still left with the fact that the Hospital remains in ‘special measures’ but I am reassured that positive steps to work towards overcoming deep-rooted management structure issues will result in this aspect being resolved – although when is uncertain.”

– Sir Bob Russell MP

"Internal major incident" stood down as Colchester Hospital returns to normal working

Colchester General Hospital. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Colchester Hospital has announced that it has returned to "normal working".

The Trust declared a "internal major incident" earlier this month after staff struggled to cope with unprecedented demand and patients were told to stay away from its A & E department if possible.

The Care Quality Commission had raised safeguarding concerns following an inspection.

“It was clear at the time of the CQC visit that our staff, particularly in the Emergency Department and the Emergency Assessment Unit, were under serious pressure.

Pressure in the hospital has now been reduced, not least because people are considering carefully whether they really need to come to the Emergency.

In addition, with the support of our health partners, including North East Essex Clinical Commissioning Group, GPs and community services – we are confident we will be able to discharge more patients from the hospital in the coming days.

This will enable our staff to concentrate their efforts on the patients who really need acute care."

– Dr Lucy Moore, Trust Chief Executive

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Watchdog: Hospital Trust 'requires improvement'

Kettering Hospital

The trust which runs Kettering General Hospital has been given an overall rating of 'Requiring Improvement' by the Care Quality Commission.

The health watchdog said it needed to improve a number of areas including its emergency services, maternity and gynaecology.

The Trust says it will address the areas highlighted and is also committed to building on its strengths.

Ambulance service warns of disruption due to strike

Staff on strike in Ipswich in October Credit: ITV News Anglia

The East of England Ambulance Service (EEAST) says there could be disruption to 999 responses today as health workers go on strike in a continued row over pay.

In October thousands walked out over the Government's decision not to accept a recommended 1 per cent pay rise for all NHS staff. Today midwives, paramedics and hospital porters will be among those taking part in four hours of national action, from 7am to 11am.

The EEAST says it does not know how many staff will take part, but that it has been working with the unions to make sure that those who need an emergency ambulance get the service they need.

"A considerable amount of contingency planning has taken place in preparation for this strike. We have been working closely with our union colleagues to ensure that those who need an emergency ambulance response get one...

"As always we are urging the public to think about using alternative services especially during the hours of strike action. "If you need medical help but it is not an emergency, consider your options, such as calling 111, contacting your GP or visiting your local pharmacist. This will help keep ambulances available to those in the greatest need."

– Steve Wheaton, Assistant Chief Ambulance Officer for Resilience and Specialist Operations
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