Live updates

Advertisement

Advertisement

Doctors at Addenbrooke's first to use new system of treating aneurysms

The procedure allows better treatment of bleeds on the brain. Credit: ITV Anglia.

Doctors at Addenbrooke's Hospital have become the first in the country to use a new method of treating aneurysms.

They were able to stop a bleed on the brain by putting a catheter in an artery in the patients wrist.

They say the procedure carries far fewer risks than the usual method of accessing the bleed via the groin.

The decision to use the radial artery rather the femoral artery was for medical reasons – in this case the femoral artery had some damage that made it an unviable catheter route.

However, the success of the procedure and its clear benefits, now opens up the more widespread use of this surgical intervention technique, which will greatly benefit patients.

– Consultant interventional neuroradiologist Dr Yogish Joshi

Norfolk Hospital triples size of its children's emergency department

The Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust Credit: ITV News Anglia

The Norfolk and Norwich University hospital says it is now able to treat more young people more quickly. Bosses have tripled the size of its children's emergency department.

The new unit has a larger waiting room and better facilities including an expansion in the delivery of mental health care for children.

“The expansion of the unit is already proving very beneficial to our younger patients and has enabled us to continue to deliver first class care. Increasing the size of the unit means a reduction in waiting times for our younger patients visiting A&E, and enhanced privacy for those patients who require it when they are receiving care.”

– Laura Hall, Children's Emergency Department Lead Sister

The expansion of the Children’s Emergency Department comes alongside the introduction of the UK’s first Older People’s Emergency Department which also opened mid-December.

Emergency summit called over ambulance death claims

An emergency summit has been called to investigate claims that patients have died after ambulance delays in our region.

The East of England Ambulance Service Trust is facing allegations that up to 20 people died over a 12-day period, at a time when, they say, there was extreme demand.

Watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Victoria Lampard.

Load more updates