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Norwich: Experts call for lifting of GM restrictions

The organisation that funds GM research in this region says European rules are holding back progress. Credit: ITV News Anglia

The organisation that funds GM research in this region says European rules are holding back progress.

The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, which funds work at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, says the regulations need to be looked at to stop them stifling crop farming.

Experts believe the technology could be key to finding ways to meet food demands in the future. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Experts believe the technology could be key to finding ways to meet food demands in the future.

"We should be focussing on the outcome, the actual change that we make, and we should be looking at the risk and the benefit of that outcome.

We shouldn't be worrying so much about the technique that we use to get there, because there isn't risks associated with the technique - it's what we use it for that's important."

– Wendy Harwood, John Innes Centre

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NASA astronaut wows students

NASA astronaut Dr Stanley Love Credit: NASA

Pupils taking GCSE astronomy in Milton Keynes have been speaking to one of their heroes - NASA astronaut Dr Stanley Love.

He was at the Open University to talk about pursuing a career in space, and about his mission to the International Space Station in 2008.

Dr Love performed two space walks during the mission, travelling on board the space shuttle Atlantis.

Cambridge scientists to produce "miracle material" graphene

Graphene is famous for its strength and ability to conduct heat. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Scientists in Cambridge say they have perfected a method for producing the form of carbon known as Graphene.

The team at Cambridge Nanosystems are now aiming to sell the material to companies who want to use it in their products.

Catharina Paukner. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Graphene is famous for its strength and ability to conduct heat.

"The Graphene is there. We have shown that it works, we have developed the layer that you would spray.

Now it's just a matter of people taking it forward."

– Catharina Paukner, Chief Scientist, Cambridge Nanosystems

Paying the price for a healthy diet: Why it could be a lot cheaper to eat junk food

Healthy eating can be hard to maintain. Busy lives often mean we reach for the quick, easy option - but not always the most nutritious.

Now researchers at the University of Cambridge have found that maintaining a balanced diet can also cost us a lot more.

They tracked nearly 100 items, and found a growing price-difference between what the Government classifies as healthy, and not-so-healthy foods.

Click below to watch a report from ITV News Anglia's Olivia Paterson

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Cambridge: Lottery money to expand explorer collection

The Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge. Credit: ITV News Anglia

The Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge has been given £500,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The money will be used to buy exhibits for the Ernest Shackleton project which aims to collect more material about the famous British explorer.

A share of £5million has been handed out to 23 museums across the UK as part of the "Collecting Cultures" programme.

Mammoth's tooth on display in new exhibition of pairs

Mammoth tooth on display at museum Credit: Polar Museum

A woolly mammoth's tooth and the bones of a finback whale are being put on show in an exhibition at the Polar Museum in Cambridge.

The items are among many that have been provided on loan from a number of museums run by the University of Cambridge.

Objects from the University's museums have been paired with items from the collections at the Polar Museum which is part of the university-run, Scott Polar Research Institute.

Called "The Thing Is", the aim is to help visitors understand why they were collected, what their meaning is and how they are cared for.

Mammoths lived between 5 million and 4,500 years ago and the tooth has been paired with a piece of scrimshaw, an ivory carving made by whalers.

Skeleton of a Finback Whale Credit: Polar Museum

This display highlights some exceptional examples of connections between the eight University of Cambridge Museums.

– Heather Lane, The Polar Museum

Research shows people who cycle or walk to work are happier

Researchers at the University of East Anglia studied 18,000 commuters. Credit: PA Images

How do you choose to commute to work every day? Well according to a new report, if you cycle or walk, then you are a happier person.

Researchers at the University of East Anglia studied 18,000 commuters dating back over two decades.

They found that people who swapped their cars for bikes or walking, were under less strain and able to concentrate more while in the office, while using public transport also improved their well-being.

Commuters who switch from driving to walking are happier

Data from the 2011 Census shows more than six in 10 commuters use cars or vans to get to work.

Commuters who switch from driving to walking or using public transport are happier, according to scientists.

Researchers from the University of East Anglia in Norwich and the University of Cambridge studied 18 years of data, on almost 18,000, 18-65 year old commuters in Britain.

They found people were less stressed and better-able to concentrate when they ditched their cars.

Data from the 2011 Census shows more than six in 10 commuters use cars or vans to get to work.

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