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Cambridge engineer still in the race for space

Dr Jenni Sidey still in the hunt for space role

An engineer from Cambridge has made it through to the next stage of a competition to find two new astronauts for the Canadian Space Agency.

Last year 3,772 applications were received by the Canadian Space Agency after its announcement that it would add two new astronauts to its roster.

Dr Jenni Sidey has made the shortlist following a rigorous selection process which lasts almost a year and involves several interviews, written exams and a range of physical and mental fitness tests.

The University of Cambridge and the Institute of Engineering and Technology congratulated her.

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Engineer in race to become Space Agency astronaut

An engineer from Cambridge has made the final 32 people competing to be part of a Canadian Space Agency drive to find new astronauts.

Watch a video report by ITV News Anglia reporter Chloe Keedy

Dr Jenni Sidey. Credit: Dr Jenni Sidey

An engineer from Cambridge has become one of 32 people competing for two positions as part of a Canadian Space Agency initiative to find new astronauts.

Last year 3,772 applications were received by the Canadian Space Agency after its announcement that it would add two new astronauts to its roster.

Dr Jenni Sidey has made the shortlist following a rigorous selection process which lasts almost a year and involves several interviews, written exams and a range of physical and mental fitness tests.

It feels great to have progressed this far in the selection process, I'm so pleased to be a part of something with so many incredible Canadians.

I'm looking forward to spending more time with them, regardless of the outcome.

– Dr Jenni Sidey

Cambridge scientists create first 3D DNA structures

Scientists took 100,000 measurements of where different parts of DNA are close to each other. Credit: University of Cambridge

Scientists from the University of Cambridge have created the first 3D structures of DNA.

Researchers used a combination of imaging and up to 100,000 measurements of where different parts of the DNA are close to each other to examine the genome in a mouse embryonic stem cell.

It's thought the findings could help identify what causes diseases such as cancer.

Researchers say the findings could help identify what causes cancer. Credit: University of Cambridge

"Visualising a genome in 3D at such an unprecedented level of detail is an exciting step forward in research and one that has been many years in the making.

"This detail will reveal some of the underlying principles that govern the organisation of our genomes – for example how chromosomes interact or how structure can influence whether genes are switched on or off.

"If we can apply this method to cells with abnormal genomes, such as cancer cells, we may be able to better understand what exactly goes wrong to cause disease, and how we could develop solutions to correct this.”

– Dr Tom Collins, Genetics and Molecular Sciences team, The Wellcome Trust
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