"Miracle" drug costs too much

A mother from Essex whose life has been extended thanks to a new cancer drug has criticised the news it's to be blocked by a health watchdog.

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Cancer patient attacks health watchdog decision

Kim Mawby has been using Kadcyla Credit: ITV News Anglia

A cancer patient from Essex has attacked a decision not to fund a new life-prolonging drug on the NHS - because it's too expensive.

Kim Mawby was told she only had six months to live three years ago when she discovered her breast cancer had spread. After being taken onto a trial for Kadcyla, she saw amazing results.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence or NICE hasannounced it would not fund the drug.

"Miracle" drug which costs too much

Credit: ITV News Anglia

A mother from Essex whose life has been extended thanks to a new cancer drug has criticised the news it's to be blocked by a health watchdog.

Kim Mawby from Nazeing in Essex was told three years ago she had 6 months to live. Her breast cancer had spread to the chest wall and lung.

The mum of two was accepted onto a trial for the drug Kadcyla. After just nine weeks on the medication she went for a scan at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London.

"We went up there with my partner and sister, we were all quite nervous and she said to me the results are more than fantastic, they're brilliant, the cancer we can't see it. That was after three treatments of Kadcyla, the cancer in the chest wall and the lung, they couldn't see anymore. Three years on it's been the same result so it's been working wonderfully for me."

– Kim Mawby

The National Institute for Clinical Excellence has announced it would not supply the drug on the NHS because £90,000 per patient per year, it is too expensive.

Kadcyla's manufacturer Roche says it's already reduced the price and other European countries have no problem funding it.

"Despite Roche offering a significant discount we are once again disappointed that NICE has not shown any flexibility on access to Kadcyla... Refusing patients access to this drug is an incredible injustice and tantamount to turning the clock back in cancer research and development."

– Dr Jayson Dalla, Roche Products Ltd

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