Live updates

Teacher has fractured skull re-built with 3D printer

Francesca Burr fractured her skull in five places but had it re-build by 3D printer.

There were fears that a primary school teacher from Essex who fell downstairs and fractured her skull in five places would not survive.

The horrific fall left Francesca Burr, from Halstead, with part of her head missing.

But surgeons at Addenbooke's Hospital in Cambridge managed to rebuild her skull using a 3D printer.

It has been a long and painful road to recovery but Francesca says the surgeons' incredible work has given her back her life.

  • Click to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Serena Sandhu

Boost for region after multi-million life science investment announced

Experts in Cambridge say this region could get a boost worth billions of pounds thanks to the government's latest life sciences strategy.

Ministers today announced plans to turn the UK into a world leader in bio-medical research.

And with this region already seeing huge investment in pioneering centres - including the proposed Public Health Laboratory in Harlow in Essex -scientists here believe they are ready to take advantage of the opportunities.

Advertisement

Sentinel satellite heads to Russia for rocket launch

The Sentinel 5P satellite Credit: Airbus Defence and Space

A Stevenage built satellite is heading to Russia for launch. The Sentinel 5P Satellite was designed and made at Airbus in the town.

Europe’s pollution monitoring satellite Sentinel-5 Precursor is heading to the launch site at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome.

The probe is part of the global monitoring programme “Copernicus”, a joint European Commission–ESA undertaking which aims to acquire continuous and accurate Earth observation data and provide services to improve the management of the environment, understand and mitigate the effects of climate change.

"This mission will give Europe new way to measure global pollution levels in much greater detail.”

– Colin Paynter, Managing Director of Airbus Defence and Space in the UK

More on the Copernicus project.

Dashcam detectives looking out for dangerous drivers

It's hoped dashcam footage can be used to prosecute more careless drivers.

A driving instructor from Peterborough has launched a campaign to install dashcams into as many learner cars as possible to improve the driving standards of other motorists.

The 'Dash Cam scheme' was set up to highlight incidents of careless and dangerous driving on the roads and to help prevent serious crashes.

They are hoping it will encourage police to find and prosecute bad drivers.

  • Click to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Liz Summers

Advertisement

Cyber attack impact still being felt

Hospitals and doctors' surgeries have been counting the cost of Friday's cyber attack which knocked out some of their computer systems.

72 hours later, the impact is still being felt - with routine operations postponed and some GPs unable to carry out non emergency appointments.

Fears of a second attack proved unfounded, but IT experts are warning of further threats in the future.

  1. National

NHS cyber attack aftermath likely to last a number of days

NHS Digital said their engineers are working 'around the clock' to fix the problems. Credit: PA

The aftermath of the "major" cyber attack which has hit the NHS is likely to last for a number of days, experts have said.

A total of 48 NHS trusts in England and 13 NHS health boards in Scotland were crippled in the global attack on Friday when a ransomware virus infiltrated dozens of NHS organisations.

Five NHS England trusts were still not back to normal on Saturday, despite NHS Digital engineers working "around the clock" in a bid to fix the problem.

NHS Digital continued that fewer than five per cent of devices within the health service still use the old Windows XP system.

"We are aware of widespread speculation about the use of Microsoft Windows XP by NHS organisations, who commission IT systems locally depending on population need.

"While the vast majority are running contemporary systems, we can confirm that the number of devices within the NHS that reportedly use XP has fallen to 4.7%, with this figure continuing to decrease.

"This may be because some expensive hardware (such as MRI scanners) cannot be updated immediately, and in such instances organisations will take steps to mitigate any risk, such as by isolating the device from the main network."

Load more updates