Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea

How to spot ash dieback disease

A guide on some of the characteristics of chalara fraxinea, a disease that is targeting woodlands in the East.

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Ash Dieback - the effects

We've been hearing a lot about Ash dieback recently - the disease that's spread from the continent and could wipe out most of the ash trees in the East Anglian countryside.

More than a hundred thousand trees have already been destroyed - and it's a wood that's used in everything from specialist sports cars to holding up church bells. So what effect is this disease having? Kate Prout has been investigating. Watch her report.

Further testing for Ash dieback disease

Testing for Ash dieback Credit: ITV Anglia

Further tests will be carried out across the region to find trees affected by Ash die-back disease and also trees that appear to have created a resistance to it.

It comes after more cases have been found in Bedfordshire.

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Experts to meet to combat ash disease

Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea
Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea Credit: T. Kirisits, Forestry Commission

Scientists, conservationists and politicians will be meeting in London today to discuss the spread of Ash dieback disease.

The number of infected trees in the ITV Anglia region is increasing. Government scientists are working with their counterparts in other countries in an attempt to combat the spread of the spores which cause the disease.

Experts to be brought together to discuss ash dieback

Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea
Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea Credit: T. Kirisits, Forestry Commission

Scientists, conservationists and politicians will be meeting in London today to discuss the spread of Ash die-back disease.

The number of infected trees in the ITV Anglia region is increasing. Government scientists are working with their counterparts in other countries in an attempt to combat the spread of the spores which cause the disease.

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Ash dieback spread

There's evidence that the deadly ash disease has spread to Essex. The infected trees are the first found in the wild outside Norfolk and Suffolk.

There are now more than 80 sites where the disease has been confirmed. One nursery owner has said he'll have to destroy his crop of 500 ash trees, even though there's no evidence of them being affected.

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