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Cambridge among world's most expensive cities for student housing

Cambridge has been ranked as the eighth most expensive city in the world for student housing. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Cambridge has been ranked as one of the top ten most expensive cities in the world for student housing.

It has the eighth highest weekly rental spend, with students having to pay $272 on average.

The research was conducted by the website Student.com, which surveyed students from 92 cities across the world.

New York was named as the most expensive city. London and Oxford also made the top ten, in second and sixth place respectively.

The findings came from research conducted by the website Student.com Credit: ITV News Anglia

"It's evident that the big urban centres around the world remain huge magnets for both international and domestic students.

"On average, students pay more to live in these cities, but that's not to say that there aren't more affordable options available.

"Cities with larger supplies of purpose-built student accommodation tend to be, on average, more affordable than cities that are under supplied.

– Luke Nolan, Chief Executive, Student.com

Stephen Hawking: 'We should start seeking other planets'

Professor Stephen Hawking has warned the human race must colonise a new planet or face dying out.

The Cambridge scientist was in London previewing a science and arts festival festival in Norway next month.

He believes overpopulation and climate change are threatening human survival and the search for other planets to live on should start now.

I strongly believe we should start seeking alternative planets for possible habitation.

We are running out of space on Earth and we need to break through the technological limitations preventing us living elsewhere in the universe.

– Professor Stephen Hawking

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Scientists to test Zika virus on brain tumours

Scientists at the University of Cambridge are to test whether the Zika virus can be used to destroy brain tumours.

It's being funded by Cancer Research UK and could potentially lead to new treatments for glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain tumour.

Each year around 2,300 people are diagnosed with glioblastoma in England.

We hope to show that the Zika virus can slow down brain tumour growth in tests in the lab. If we can learn lessons from Zika's ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and target brain stem cells selectively, we could be holding the key to future treatments.

– Dr Harry Bulstrode, a Cancer Research UK scientist at the University of Cambridge
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