Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea

How to spot ash dieback disease

A guide on some of the characteristics of chalara fraxinea, a disease that is targeting woodlands in the East.

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Smart-phone app to fight ash tree disease

Smart-phone APP to tackle Ash dieback disease Credit: ITVAnglia

Experts at the University of East Anglia in Norwich have developed a smart-phone app to help fight ash dieback disease. Called Ash Tag the device holds photos of trees with ash dieback, so anyone who thinks they've spotted it in their area can use the app to check.

They can then send photos into a team of environmental specialists for analysis. Here's the link to the Ash Tag website.

Ash tree imports to be banned

Ash tree
Ash tree Credit: ITV Anglia

Imports of ash trees will be banned from Monday in an attempt to stop the spread of a disease that has practically wiped them out in parts of Denmark.

Chalara fraxinea has been found in at least eleven woods in Norfolk and Suffolk. In Denmark the fungus has wiped out 90% of ash trees in seven years. The Environment Secretary will be banning the ash imports which it's believed have introduced the fungus to the UK

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Sick ash trees in the East

A disease which has wiped out 90% of ash trees in Denmark has been found for the first time in mature forests in this country - right here in East Anglia.

Ash dieback is spreading far faster than expected raising fears of an outbreak as devastating as the impact of Dutch Elm Disease in the 1970s when 25 million trees died in the UK alone.

Ash trees at Pound Farm Wood near Framlingham in Suffolk and Ashwellthorpe in Norfolk are among those affected.

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