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Britain's hottest September day for more than 100 years

Britain has had its hottest September day since 1911.

The temperature at Gravesend in Kent reached 34.4°C also making it the hottest day of 2016.

The highest temperature reached in the Anglia region was 32.1°C recorded in Thurleigh in Bedfordshire and Writtle in Essex.

Temperatures around the Anglia region at 3pm on Tuesday 13 September 2016. Credit: Met Office

The highest September temperature ever recorded in the Anglia region was 34.6°C at Raunds in Northamptonshire on 8 September 1911.

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Hottest September day since 1949

Britain has seen its hottest day in September since 1949.

As the temperature at Heathrow airport passed 32.2°C, the Met Office announced that it was the first time that 32°C has been exceeded in September for nearly 70 years.

In the Anglia region the temperature had reached 30°C at a number of locations by 1pm including Cambridge, Woburn in Bedfordshire and Harpenden in Hertfordshire.

The highest September temperature ever recorded in the Anglia region was 34.6°C at Raunds in Northamptonshire on 8 September 1911.

Temperatures recorded at 1pm on Tuesday 13 September in the Anglia region. Credit: Met Office

Temperatures soar on one of the hottest September days

Health warnings have been issued on what could be the hottest September day in more than 50 years.

Britain's Indian summer will sizzle with temperatures on Tuesday potentially reaching 31°C (88°F).

The hot weather will hit the East of England, the South East, the capital and the East Midlands, which have been on "heatwave Level 2 status".

Temperatures at 10am has already reached 25°C in the Anglia region. Credit: Met Office

Temperatures have already started to climb in the Anglia region.

It had reached 25°C (77°F) in Weybourne on the north Norfolk coast by 10am on Tuesday.

The last time temperatures soared above 30°C (86°F) in September was in 2006 in Kew Gardens, which hit 30.5C (87°F) on 11 September. <

If the mercury rises above 31.6°C (88.9°F), which was reached at Gatwick on 2 September 1961, then it will be the hottest day for 55 years.

Ambulance service issues hot weather warning

Hot weather warning. Credit: ITV News Anglia

With hot weather predicted in this region over the next few days, the East of England Ambulance Service is reminding people to stay safe in the sun.

They are advising those who head outdoors to wear sun cream and drink plenty of water. In extreme cases the hot weather can cause heat stroke.

Clinical lead Dave Allen said: "Everyone welcomes the warm weather and we want everyone to make the most of it, but to enjoy it and not needing to call 999."

  • Wear a hat
  • Take particular care when the sun is at its hottest between 11am and 3pm, sticking to shady areas where possible
  • Wear plenty of high-factor sun cream and don't forget to top up regularly, and replenish after swimming.
  • Use insect repellent if you are prone to bites
  • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated
  • If planning a barbecue, take all the usual precautions, ensure food is cooked thoroughly and protect yourself and others from flames.

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After the heatwave comes the weather warning for heavy rain and thunderstorms

The Met Office has extended the yellow warning for heavy rain and thunderstorms across the whole of East Anglia.

Its warning of the risk of localised flash flooding and hail along with potential for disruption to travel and power supplies.

The area covered by a Met Office yellow weather warning on Wednesday 20 July 2016. Credit: Met Office

The weather warning is valid until 9pm on Wednesday 20 July 2016

The Met Office says areas of heavy thunderstorms will continue to affect parts of Scotland and northern England into this afternoon before slowly clearing away northeast.

However isolated heavy thunderstorms may still develop across Scotland and parts of England, including some central, eastern and southeastern areas, this afternoon and this evening.

The Met Office said: "Whilst most places will miss the worst, please be aware of the risk of localised flash flooding. Frequent lightning, large hail and strong winds could be additional hazards. All of this could lead to some flooding of homes, businesses and transport networks. Disruption to power is also possible."

"Hot, moist air spreading north and northeast across the UK today will produce thunderstorms, initially organised within large areas of rain before becoming more isolated this afternoon.

"Rainfall will be very variable, but some places could see around 30 mm in an hour and more than 50 mm in a few hours.

"The thunderstorms later this afternoon are likely to be most widespread across northern England and Scotland, and it is here that there is the greatest risk of disruption.

"Further south, they will be much more isolated, with disruption less likely, across the rest of England."

– Met Office Chief Forecaster's Assessment

How to cool down in the heat - use a giant water slide!

The fun way to cool down in the heat! Credit: Emily Knight

A huge inflatable water slide has been set up in Norwich city centre as part of the Lord Mayor’s Celebration events.

Hundreds of spectators lined the streets to see people having a go on 100-metre three lane SlideRider.

Credit: Emily Knight

The slide was there to raise money for Cancer Research UK. It was also the perfect way to cool down in the heat!

Credit: Emily Knight

Midday temperatures reach 29°C in the Anglia region

Norwich was the hottest place in the UK at midday on Saturday 4th July 2015 with a temperature of 28.6°C (83.5°F) recorded at the city's international airport.

Many places in the Anglia region had their hottest July day on record on Wednesday when the thermometer touched 35.3°C (95.5°F) at Wittering in Cambridgeshire.

Temperatures at 12 noon in the Anglia region on Saturday 4 July 2015. Credit: Met Office
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