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Remembering the holocaust - one man's story

As the world marks the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz one survivor from Suffolk has told his family's story.

More than a million people died at Auschwitz in German-occupied Poland - the largest and most notorious Nazi concentration camp.

Frank Bright from Suffolk lived through the ordeal. But his parents and most of his classmates did not. He is 86 now and more determined than ever to keep their memories alive.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Natalie Gray

Remembering Auschwitz

It's the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the largest and most notorious Nazi concentration camp, Auschwitz in German-occupied Poland. More than a million people died there - it was slaughter on an industrial scale.

Some Jews managed to escape to Britain before war broke out. Martin Cahn's father left Germany when he was a child after he was attacked in the street. Mr Cahn now lives in Impington in Cambridgeshire.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Claire McGlasson

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100th anniversary of first Zeppelin raid over Norfolk

Memorial to two of the victims Credit: ITV News Anglia

A memorial service will take place today marking the 100th anniversary of the first aerial bombardments of World War One, which took place over Norfolk on 19th January 1915.

Because of bad weather the German zeppelins were diverted to our coastline for the start of their bombing campaign.

Two airships dropped bombs on King's Lynn, Great Yarmouth and Sheringham, with the loss of four lives.

Sheringham Museum holds in its collection, one of the first bombs dropped on Britain during the raid.

One of the shells from the raid is held in Sheringham Museum Credit: ITV News Anglia
Jean Tuck, Granddaughter of eyewitness Credit: ITV News Anglia

"Nobody really knew what it was, there probably were some people who did know what it was. But nobody ran away or thought they would be in any danger, they just stood there looking up at it."

– Jean Tuck, Granddaughter of eyewitness

Letter written in trenches about Christmas Day 'Truce' could fetch £20,000 at auction

The letter about the 'Truce' football match written in the trenches Credit: Northampton Museum
The letter was written by William Henry Loasby Credit: ITV News Anglia

A letter written by a Northamptonshire soldier from the trenches of the First World War could fetch £20,000 at auction.

The note by Lance Corporal Willie Loasby describes how he organised the famous Christmas Day Truce by shouting to German soldiers in nearby trenches.

The letter is being sold by a collector from Northampton.

Kettering war memorial Credit: ITV News Anglia
Peter Robinson, Northampton Museum Credit: ITV News Anglia

"It's a first hand account written to his mother and it gives details of how they contacted the Germans, how they met, how they were quite antagonistic towards each other, but became quite friendly really."

– Peter Robinson, Northampton Museum

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Horse bones could be famous thoroughbred from history

A skeleton of a horse has been uncovered in Newmarket that could be one of Britain's most successful thoroughbreds. The bones were discovered during excavations of the former royal stables in the town.

Historians hope they're those of Dr Syntax, the most famous racehorse of the 19th century. Archaeologists are assessing the remains to try and find out more.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Tanya Mercer

The wartime secrets of the mysterious Langham Dome

What wartime secrets were kept in the mysterious Langham dome? Credit: ITV News Anglia

It's a curious building perched closed to the North Norfolk coast but it played a vital role in the Second World War.

The Langham Dome just a new miles from Blakeney hid a secret that helped Britain deal with the aerial bombardment from Germany.

It's now been restored and turned into a museum where its mystery can now be revealed.

Kate Prout reports on the Langham Dome in the ITV News Anglia Hidden Histories series

Codebreakers' reunion 75 years on - now their story will hit the big screen

80 Bletchley Park veterans have returned for a reunion 75 years after the War. Credit: ITV News Anglia

It's 75 years since Bletchley Park in Milton Keynes, became a secret base for code-breakers during the Second World War.

The milestone comes with the release of a film, in November, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing. The Bletchley team was credited with bringing an early end to the war by cracking the German's Enigma machine.

Turing was one of thousands working at Bletchley from 1939 - now 80 of those veterans have returned, some for the first time in many years.

ITV News Anglia's Luke Farrington reports

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