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Dog killed after 'eating dead fish' on Norfolk beach

Dog-walkers are being urged to take care when walking their pets

People have been warned to be careful while walking their dogs on the beach on the north-Norfolk coast, after a dog was killed after reportedly eating a "dead fish that had washed up".

The Hunstanton RNLI confirmed a dog died just an hour after ingesting one on Cley beach.

They're urging people to keep a close eye on their animals while on a beach stroll.

Penguin reunion but 'Dippy' the eldest has cold feet

A group of penguins, who were split up and sent to two Norfolk Sea Life centres, when a wildlife park closed down on the Isle of Wight, have been reunited in Great Yarmouth.

The humboldt penguins will now live at the Sea Life centre in Yarmouth while their home is refurbished at the Hunstanton centre.

Staff say they all settled in quickly, but Dippy who already lives in Great Yarmouth and who is the eldest penguin at 22 years old, was a little bit anxious about the new penguins coming into his new home.

Staff release penguins into their new enclosure in Great Yarmouth Credit: ITV News Anglia

''Dippy is our eldest penguin, he's 22 and he's also a bit of a superstar and he kind of wanted reassurance. Who are all these penguins and am I still your favourite and of course he is.''

– Darren Gook, Senior Marine Biologist
One of the penguins happily taking the plunge Credit: ITV News Anglia

"Humbodlts are very sociable birds and they'll love being part of a bigger flock for a few months while the work is carried out at Hunstanton. We're expecting lots of bill tapping and friendly honking at each other. They've a lot to catch up on."

– Terri Harris, Great Yarmouth Sea Life General Manager

Dippy suffers from arthritis, and a gently sloping 'disabled access ramp' has been provided from him at the Great Yarmouth centre.

Staff trying to persuade 'Dippy' to get into the water Credit: ITV News Anglia

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Sealife centre welcomes new baby penguin to flock

Pip was born weighing just 92 grams. Credit: Hunstanton Sealife Centre

Hunstanton Sealife Centre in Norfolk has welcomed a new baby penguin to their flock.

Pip was born weighing just 92 grams to Humboldt penguins Charlie and Jerome.

Staff chose the name, which could be changed to Pippa if the penguin is a girl, in honour of Pippa Middleton’s marriage to James Matthews.

Pip was born to Humboldt penguins Charlie and Jerome. Credit: Hunstanton Sealife Centre

“The whole team is bursting with joy at the arrival of our first ever penguin chick - we are all beaming like we are new parents ourselves!

"Humboldt penguins are an extremely vulnerable species and it is the first time we have had a penguin chick here at the Sanctuary.”

– Hollie Stephenson, Aquar

Post mortem examination to be carried out on stranded whale at Hunstanton

The whale at Hunstanton on Thursday. Credit: UK Coastguard.

A post mortem examination is due to be carried out on a sperm whale that died last night after becoming stranded on the beach at Hunstanton.

It is thought the animal died at about 8pm yesterday. It was first discovered on the sand 12 hours earlier.

Stephen Marsh, operations manager for the British Divers Marine Life Rescue, said the Defra-funded Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme would carry out a post mortem examination "when conditions allow" today.

The whale is thought to have belonged to the same pod as those who died two weeks ago off the Norfolk and Lincolnshire coasts.

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Stranded sperm whale on Norfolk beach has died

The stranded sperm whale on Thursday. Credit: ITV News Anglia.

Divers trying to help a stranded sperm whale on the Norfolk coast have confirmed it has died.

The British Divers Marine Life Rescue said the stricken animal had taken its last breath at about 8pm.

They expect to receive official confirmation of its death later this evening once zoological experts have assessed the body.

"We're very sad to confirm that the whale has died but it is a bit of a relief because it had been in quite a lot of suffering."

– Stephen Marsh, Operations Manager, British Divers Marine Life Rescue.
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Farewell to a sperm whale that died on the Norfolk coast

The cost of removing a dead sperm whale from the beach at Hunstanton is costing the local council thousands of pounds.

Workmen using chainsaws, a digger and lots of skips, removed the 30 tonne carcass from where it washed up a week ago.

The remains have been taken to an animal incinerator facility outside of the county. Four other whales, washed up in Lincolnshire, have also been disposed of.

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