Live updates

World squash champion told she cannot bring family back to UK

Cassie Thomas, nee Jackman, with her family.

A former world squash champion from Norfolk says immigration officials are preventing her from bringing her family back to her home county.

Six-time British champion Cassie Jackman, now Cassie Thomas, moved to Australia five years ago with her husband.

They now want to return to Norfolk, where they have a home, but Australian Mr Thomas - who has secured a job in the county - has been refused a visa.

UK immigration officials turned down his application on the grounds that he originally left through "personal choice".

Cassie in 1999. Credit: ITV News Anglia.

Election 2015 - your issues raised

Today marks 100 days to go until the General Election Credit: ITV News

With 100 days to go until the General Election, an exclusive poll commissioned by ITV News has highlighted the top concerns for voters.

Nationally, the NHS came out as the biggest issue.

But here in the East, immigration is the top priority - 55% of those questioned said it should be a main focus for the government - compared to 49% nationally.

Managing the National Health service is a very close second for our region, with 53% saying it should be a priority issue.

And the cost of living rounds out the top 3 - with 25% citing it as a concern.

ITV News Anglia's Political Correspondent Emma Hutchinson has been talking to all the main party leaders about what they're doing to convince voters.

Advertisement

PM sets out tough rules on immigration

The Prime Minister's given a speech in Ipswich setting out tough new rules for immigrants hoping to claim benefits and get on council house waiting lists.

David Cameron said immigrants would have to earn the right to use public services.

There's concern though that the announcement could stir up racial tensions in some communities in this region.

  1. National

PM: We must ensure those coming here are brightest

Outlining his immigration plans, David Cameron has said: "Under the previous government immigration was far too high and the system was badly out of control. Net migration needs to come down radically from hundreds of thousands a year to just tens of thousands."

He added: "As we bring net migration down, so we must also make sure that Britain continues to benefit from it...

"That means ensuring the people who do come here are the brightest and the best, the people we really need with the skills and entrepreneurial talent to help create the British jobs and growth that will help us to win in the global race."

Advertisement

  1. National

Immigrants 'significantly less likely' to claim benefits

Jonathan Portes, director of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, said immigrants were "significantly less likely" to claim benefits than people born in the UK - and that those coming from EU countries put more into the economy than they took out.

He told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme arrivals were mostly younger people whereas the bulk of spending went on healthcare and pensions for older people.

"All the evidence suggests that people who come here from within the European Union make a substantial net contribution to the public finances - they pay in far more than they take out," he said.

He also played down the impact of health tourism as a "minuscule" part of a wider funding issue.