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Dippy the Dinosaur's Jurassic tour

Dippy the Diplodocus is off to Norwich Credit: PA Images

One of the most famous dinosaurs in the world is on the march to Norwich.

Dippy the Diplodocus is seen by millions of people every year in the central hall of the Natural History Museum in London.

The 70ft plaster-cast sauropod replica has been on display there since 1979 but sets off next year on a national tour to seven towns and cities ending up at Norwich Cathedral in 2020.

We wanted Dippy to visit unusual locations so he can draw in people that may not traditionally visit a museum. Making iconic items accessible to as many people as possible is at the heart of what museums give to the nation, so we have ensured that Dippy will still be free to view at all tour venues.

– Sir Michael Dixon, Natural History Museum

Dippy will spend at least four to six months at each location because he will have to be taken apart and reconstructed at every stop on the tour. A total of 1.5 million people are expected to see him.

The replica dinosaur was cast from original fossil bones discovered in the US in 1898.

Jurassic tour: 1.5 million people will be getting close up to Dippy on his tour of the country. Credit: PA Images

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Peregrine Falcon chick dies

Eleanor, the Falcon found passed away Credit: The Hawk and Owl Trust

One of the four peregrine falcon chicks that hatched on the spire of Norwich Cathedral has died.

Over a million people have watched the chicks since they were born in May thanks to a webcam set up by the Hawk and Owl Trust.

The body of the chick named Eleanor was found on the church roof.

The trust say the three other falcon chicks named Nelson, Edith and Perry now all sit together on the tower.

Norwich celebrates Coronation

Refreshments will be held in the cathedral cloisters after the service Credit: PA

The 60th anniversary of the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II is being celebrated in a special service at Norwich Cathedral today at 3.30pm.

The event marks sixty years since Queen Elizabeth's coronation ceremony in Westminster Abbey on 2 June 1953, 18 months after she succeeded her father King George VI as monarch.

Elizabeth II after her coronation in June 1953 Credit: PA wire

Norwich cathedral peregrine chicks growing fast

The four peregrine falcon chicks which hatch on the spire of Norwich cathedral are growing fast Credit: Owl & Hawk Trust

Three weeks after the first one hatched, the peregrine falcon chicks atop the spire of Norwich cathedral are growing fast.

According to the Hawk and Owl Trust, the four chicks are now sporting their first feathers among their down. Their parents are also leaving them for longer periods.

The British Trust for Ornithology is hoping to ring the chicks this week to gleam vital scientific information about the life of the birds once they leave their roof-top perch.

Click here to see live pictures of the peregrine falcons

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Peregrine falcon chicks given ID ring

Volunteers at the Hawk and Owl Trust and the North West Norfolk Ringing Group have attached ID rings to the legs of the chicks

The peregrine falcon chicks on the spire of Norwich Cathedral have been fitted with identification rings.

Metal and plastic rings have been attached to the legs of the chicks by volunteers at the Hawk and Owl Trust and the North West Norfolk Ringing Group.

The volunteers say the rings are harmless and help to monitor the population and distribution of peregrines within the UK.

Each chick has a metal ring with its own unique identification number.

The female chick is already much bigger than her brothers and will be a third bigger than them once they are all fully grown.

A fourth egg did not hatch and has been removed from the platform - it will be sent for analysis.

The young peregrines will be taking their first flights in two to three weeks time.

Cathedral peregrine falcon webcam

The peregrine falcons are nesting on the spire of Norwich Cathedral Credit: The Hawk and Owl Trust

One of the peregrine falcons nesting on the spire of Norwich Cathedral has laid an egg.

The birds became internet stars after a webcam was installed by the Hawk and Owl Trust in 2011, allowing viewers to watch their every move.

Staff from the charity are hoping for a succesful breeding season after the eggs laid last year didn't hatch.