Bumblebees fly a mile for food

A study by the University of East Anglia has found that hungry bumblebees travel more than a mile to find food.

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Thousands turn out for Science Festival

Thousands of youngsters in Cambridge have been finding out how they can use science in their everyday lives as part of a drive to get more of them interested in the subject. The annual University of Cambridge Science Festival allows children to take part in a range of activities.

Last weekend alone more than 20,000 people attended events around the City and it's hoped that figure will be beaten this weekend.

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Computer game to help in fight against ash dieback

A Facebook game developed by scientists in Norwich could help in the fight against the tree disease ash dieback.

The deadly fungus was first discovered in the wild in Britain in the Anglia region last year. It's now threatening the UK's 80 million ash trees.

Click below to watch a report from ITV News Anglia's Natalie Gray

Click here to find the Facebook game

Online game to help in fight against ash tree disease

A new online game could help in the battle against ash dieback Credit: ITV Anglia

Scientists in Norwich working to tackle a disease which is threatening to wipe out millions of ash trees are enlisting the help of online gamers.

A Facebook game has been designed in which players match colour sequences but also provide crucial data which could find trees resistant to the disease.

Scientists from the Norwich Research Park worked with a game company to design Fraxinus. Players match sequences of coloured leaves which also represent strings of genetic information from ash trees with chalara ash dieback.

Scientists hope the game data may provide information which leads to disease-resistant trees. Credit: ITV Anglia

The tree disease was first identified in Britain last year and is spreading fast.

Scientists say data from the game may be able to help provide information to breed naturally-resistant ash trees.

Lasting tribute for Cambridge DNA pioneer

Sixty years ago Cambridge scientist Francis Crick from Northamptonshire and his partner James Watson famously mapped out the structure of DNA.

James Watson has travelled from America back at his old college in the university city to unveil a memorial to his former colleague who died in 2004.

Their work opened up vast new avenues in the understanding of the genetic code and won them a Nobel Prize.

Click below to watch a report by ITV Anglia's Claire McGlasson:

New memorial to Cambridge DNA pioneer

Sixty years ago Cambridge scientists Francis Crick and James Watson showed the world their discovery of the structure of DNA - the building blocks of all life on Earth.

Now a there's a new memorial in Cambridge to Francis Crick, who died in 2004. It was unveiled by his former research partner James Watson.

Click below to watch a report from ITV News Anglia's Claire McGlasson:

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