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Norfolk woman says she is a different person after brain injury

Fiona Linge suffered a brain aneurysm two years ago Credit: ITV News Anglia

A woman from Thetford in Norfolk who suffered a brain aneurysm two years ago is speaking out in support of a new study that's looked at how people feel after suffering a brain injury.

Fiona Linge collapsed a coupe of weeks after her 50th Birthday. She spent six months in hospital.

The charity Headway has found that 74% of survivors felt like a new person, often experiencing personality changes.

"I don't think I'm a different person, but things are different. It's like I have to forget the old me before this happened."

– Fiona Linge

Fiona told ITV News Anglia that her favourite colour is no longer green, she doesn't like chocolate anymore, but has developed a new taste for organes.

69%
Say felt their self-esteem was worse
Fiona at home in Thetford Credit: ITV News Anglia

Cyber attack impact still being felt

Hospitals and doctors' surgeries have been counting the cost of Friday's cyber attack which knocked out some of their computer systems.

72 hours later, the impact is still being felt - with routine operations postponed and some GPs unable to carry out non emergency appointments.

Fears of a second attack proved unfounded, but IT experts are warning of further threats in the future.

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Cyber attack hits companies across Asia

China and Japan have both fallen victim to the global "ransomware" cyber attack that has created chaos in 150 countries.

Chinese state media say more than 29,000 institutions across the country have been infected, along with hundreds of thousands of devices.

Xinhua News Agency cited the Threat Intelligence Centre of Qihoo 360, a Chinese internet security services company.

It said universities and educational institutions were among the hardest hit, numbering 4,341, or about 15% of internet protocol addresses attacked.

Also affected were railway stations, mail delivery, petrol stations, hospitals, office buildings, shopping malls and government services.

The Japan Computer Emergency Response Team Co-ordination Centre said 2,000 computers at 600 companies in Japan had been affected.

Double amputee crash victim begins 150-mile bike ride

Double amputee crash victim Shaun Whiter begins 150-mile bike ride Credit: ITV Anglia

A footballer, who lost both of his legs in a hit and run crash near Newmarket, set off on a 150-mile charity bike ride today.

Shaun Whiter joined 100 cyclists representing Ipswich Town Football Club for the ride around Suffolk. He's using a specially designed bike for the two-day tour.

The inspirational 28-year-old, whose Newmarket Town FC career was cut short by the crash, says he is doing the charity challenge to say thank you to the people who have helped him through the trauma.

"One to repay Ipswich Town for what they've done and got me back into sport and in an environment around people again. And we have raised just over three thousand pounds."

– Shaun Whiter

Shaun and his friend Joey Abbs were left for dead at the side of the road near Newmarket on July 1 last year .

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NHS cyber attack aftermath likely to last a number of days

NHS Digital said their engineers are working 'around the clock' to fix the problems. Credit: PA

The aftermath of the "major" cyber attack which has hit the NHS is likely to last for a number of days, experts have said.

A total of 48 NHS trusts in England and 13 NHS health boards in Scotland were crippled in the global attack on Friday when a ransomware virus infiltrated dozens of NHS organisations.

Five NHS England trusts were still not back to normal on Saturday, despite NHS Digital engineers working "around the clock" in a bid to fix the problem.

NHS Digital continued that fewer than five per cent of devices within the health service still use the old Windows XP system.

"We are aware of widespread speculation about the use of Microsoft Windows XP by NHS organisations, who commission IT systems locally depending on population need.

"While the vast majority are running contemporary systems, we can confirm that the number of devices within the NHS that reportedly use XP has fallen to 4.7%, with this figure continuing to decrease.

"This may be because some expensive hardware (such as MRI scanners) cannot be updated immediately, and in such instances organisations will take steps to mitigate any risk, such as by isolating the device from the main network."

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