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Plans to transform 7th century Suffolk burial ground unveiled

A visitor looks at an exhibition of artefacts from Sutton Hoo. Credit: PA

The National Trust has today unveiled a new £2.4m project to transform the Sutton Hoo burial ground.

The 7th century ground, near Woodbridge in Suffolk, is considered one of the world’s most important archaeological sites.

Plans include building a raised platform to provide views over the entire burial ground and to the River Deben beyond it.

An enhanced formal education programme, an art and craftsmanship programme and new volunteering roles will also be introduced.

The project has received a £150,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to progress through its early development stages.

The National Trust says it will consult with the local community about the overall shape of the plans.

“We want to enrich and enhance the experience people have when visiting Sutton Hoo.

“This special place is about so much more than the treasure, it tells the hugely significant story of how the first English people lived their lives.

“Their significance continues to resonate down the centuries in our language, our craft traditions and our connections to land and landscape.

– Luke Potter, East Suffolk General Manager

Historical artefacts discovered in Suffolk

Now if you think of Royal houses in the east you probably think of Sandringham.

But hundreds of years before Kings and Queens built a palace in West Norfolk, the Suffolk coast was the seat of power for the Anglo-Saxons.

And just recently archaeologists have discovered artefacts at Rendlesham near Sutton Hoo, which they say is conclusive evidence that there was once a grand royal settlement there.

Is this the most important archaeological find of a generation, Tanya Mercer went along to find out more.


Anglo-Saxon treasures recreated

A new exhibition aimed atbringing old treasures to life by recreating them just as it would have lookedin 625AD, is opening at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk.

The real treasure has been corroded over time but the new replicas made using traditional Anglo-Saxon metalworking and crafting techniques will give people the chance to see them in all their former glory.

They replicate the treasures found inside the remains of a seventh century ship, believed to be that of Anglo-Saxon King Raedwald.

Staff at the National Trust museum has been putting together the finishing touches.