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Viewer pictures: Thunderstorms in the East

Lightning striking over Happisburgh Lighthouse in Norfolk Credit: Russell Waite

So the early hours of Saturday 4 July saw widespread electrical storms across East Anglia.

It seemed some of you took a few shots of the storms.

Credit: Russell Waite
This was taken by 12 year old Abigail from Luton in Bedfordshire Credit: Abigail Lacey
Credit: Philip Thulbourn
Gavin took this from his bedroom window from Bury St Edmunds Credit: Gavin C
This was taken in Bury St Edmunds as the storm moved away Credit: Simmy Knight
Lightning over the new cap at St Helena Windmill in Horsford Credit: Melanie Smith

Thunderstorms produce a fortnight's worth of rain

Lightning captured in the village of Croydon between Cambridge and Biggleswade. Credit: Bob Burling

With every good heatwave in the British summer there is nearly always a spectacular thunderstorm or two.

The early hours of Saturday 4 July saw widespread electrical storms across East Anglia.

At Hitchin in Hertfordshire there was 35 mm of rain, which is more than normally falls in two weeks in July.

The overnight deluge make it the wettest day of the year so far in the East of England.

Rainfall totals in the Anglia region in the 12 hours to 10am on Saturday

  • 21.4 mm in Bedford
  • 21.2 mm in Woburn, Bedfordshire
  • 17.6 mm in Monks Wood near Sawtry, Cambridgeshire
  • 15.0 mm in Harpenden, Hertfordshire
  • 13.6 mm in Holbeach, Lincolnshire
  • 11.8 mm in Wattisham, Suffolk
  • 8.0 mm in Writtle, Essex
  • 7.2 mm in Cambridge
  • 3.8 mm in Norwich

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Met Office weather warning for heavy rain on Friday night

The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for the risk of heavy rain, hail and lightning on Friday night into Saturday.

There is a chance of some very localised significant disruption, mainly from surface water flooding. Lightning and hail could also cause some impacts.

The warning is valid from noon on Friday 12 June until 7am on Saturday 13 June 2015

Area covered by a Met Office yellow weather warning for heavy rain on Friday night into Saturday. Credit: Met Office

"An area of warm, very humid air is expected to move northwards across France into southern Britain later on Thursday and into Friday. Whilst isolated thunderstorms are possible from Thursday, these become more likely and potentially more severe by Friday afternoon, with the potential for 20 to 30 mm falling within an hour or so, probably on a very localised basis.

"Indications are that a more organised band of heavy rain and thunderstorms will follow by Friday evening and overnight into Saturday, bringing 25 to 50 mm of rain more widely, again with the potential for some very high short-period totals."

– Met Office Chief Forecaster's Assessment

The Met Office says given the complexity of the developments leading up to this event, ideas on areas at greatest risk of heavy rainfall and severe thunderstorms may well change, and this warning will be updated accordingly.

No trains from Norwich to Ipswich after lightning strike causes signal failure

No trains are currently running from Norwich to Ipswich. Credit: PA

No trains are currently running from Norwich to Ipswich after a lightning strike caused signalling problems at a "number of locations" between Ipswich and Diss.

National Rail say that trains aren't expected to be running again until at least 12.30 - although it could take even longer.

Customers are being encouraged to travel from Norwich to Cambridge, where they will then be able to go on to London.

Steamy and stormy on the hottest day of the year so far

A storm over Scratby beach near Great Yarmouth in Norfolk on Friday 5 June 2015. Credit: Karl Hammett

Some parts of the Anglia region have woken to thunder and torrential downpours as storms swept in from the Continent.

There is a Met Office yellow weather warning in place for further localised thunderstorms through Friday.

But it is also expected to be the warmest day of the year so far with temperatures in the region forecast to rise to 25°C (77°F).

By 10am it had already reached 20°C (68°F) in Higham near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. At 11am it was 24°C (75°F) in Writtle near Chelmsford in Essex.

Temperatures in the Anglia region at 11am on Friday 5 June 2015. Credit: Met Office

Please send your weather pictures from the Anglia region to angliaweather@itv.com

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Weather warning for scattered thunderstorms in East Anglia

The East of England has a yellow weather warning in force for heavy rain valid until 7pm on Friday Credit: Met Office

Yellow weather warning valid from 1030 hrs until 1900 hrs on Friday 5 June

The Met Office has issued a yellow weather warning for the risk of heavy thundery downpours during Friday in the Anglia region.

There's the risk of localised surface water flooding which may lead to disruption to transport and outdoor activities. Frequent lightning and hail could prove to be an additional hazard.

The Met Office says scattered thunderstorms will continue to affect parts of south east England and East Anglia today (Friday) before clearing away early this evening. Though many places will miss the heaviest rain, there will be some localised intense downpours

"An area of very warm air lies across southeastern areas today, providing a focus for locally intense thundery downpours which will give 10 to 15 mm of rain less than an hour. There is still a small chance of over 20 mm of rain in an hour in the far east of this warning area, and if these heavier storms develop impacts could still be more substantial."

– Met Office Chief Forecaster
The rainfall radar at 6.50am showed the heaviest downpours in Cambridgeshire and Essex. Credit: Met Office

The thunderstorms should clear away eastwards on Friday night.

The Met Office says: "As is typical of this type of situation there is considerable uncertainty regarding extent and timing of any thunderstorms, with some places within the warning area probably escaping the downpours."

Thunderstorms and heavy downpours in the south of the Anglia region

The rainfall radar indicating some heavy downpours along the Hertfordshire-Essex border. Credit: Met Office

Warm humid conditions have sparked thundery downpours in the south of the Anglia region in parts of south Bedfordshire and north Hertfordshire spreading into Essex and Suffolk.

The Met Office says the risk of thunderstorms could last into Sunday evening with the potential for localised surface water flooding. Heavy showers could hit any part of the Anglia region.

Nearly 5 mm of rain was recorded in one hour at 4pm in Harpenden in Hertfordshire.

Temperatures in the Anglia region at 4pm on Sunday 3 May 2015

  • 20.4°C in Santon Downham, Suffolk
  • 19.2°C in Weybourne, Norfolk
  • 19.0°C in Monks Wood near Sawtry, Cambs
  • 18.9°C in Cavendish, Suffolk
  • 18.9°C at Norwich Airport
Map indicating where lightning has been recorded in the hour to 3.35pm on Sunday 3 May 2015. Credit: Met Office
  • Please send any pictures to angliaweather@itv.com

"You can't live like this": Essex MP calls for action over flash floods

It's been a day of clearing up for hundreds of people after flash flooding hit the region over the weekend.

In Essex more than 200 homes were affected - while the storms and sudden downpour also caused problems for more than 60 homes in and around Norwich.

In both cases residents are calling for action to prevent a repeat.

Click below to watch a report from ITV News Anglia's Tanya Mercer

Norwich: Residents concerned about city's drainage system after flash floods

The flood water was more than a foot deep near Hall Road in Norwich. Credit: ITV News Anglia

People are beginning the clear-up after flash flooding caused damage across the region yesterday.

In Essex there are calls for an investigation after 200 homes were flooded on Canvey Island.

More than two inches of rain fell but at the same time the pump system that takes water out into the Thames Estuary failed because of a lightning strike.

Meanwhile, Norwich was the wettest part in the UK and several homes were flooded.

Residents want to see more done so the city can cope better with flash flooding in future.

"The last few summers, they've been fairly dry.

So, they seem to have left the drains and not serviced them, but not just in this area, it seems around the city as well.

What they are now doing is reactive.

If it was preventative, maybe it would never have flooded in the first place."

– Colin Hymers, Resident
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