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Long traffic delays for sell-out airshow

Drivers using the A505 in Cambridgeshire are being warned of two hour delays around Duxford as people head to the air show.

Organisers say it's sold out and are urging the public not to turn up without a ticket.

The say the only car parks still open are exclusively for the use of advance ticket holders. If you already have a ticket you will be directed to the advance ticket holders’ car parks.

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Car parks full at Duxford Air Show: Stay away plea by organisers

A Hurricane fighter aircraft at Duxford Airfield in Cambridgeshire. Credit: Chris Radburn/PA Archive

Unless you have pre-booked tickets, organisers of the Duxford Air Show in Cambridgeshire are advising drivers to stay away after car parks filled up by 8.15am.

It's the second day of the show at the Imperial War Museum and tickets are still available for people arriving on foot or by courtesy bus.

Organisers said: "Our car parks for advance ticket holders remain open. If you already have a ticket you will be directed to a car park reserved exclusively for advance ticket holders."

"The Meadow car park is now full and there is no longer any car parking available for visitors who wish to buy a ticket and are arriving by car. If you do not have a ticket for The Duxford Air Show today and are coming by car, please do not travel to IWM Duxford."

– IWM Duxford

Highlights of the Duxford Air Show

  • The Red Arrows aerobatic display team
  • Avro Lancaster from the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum
  • Boeing 727
  • Westland Sea King helicopter from the RAF's 22 Squadron at Wattisham, Suffolk
  • Flying Fortress Sally B from B-17 Preservation
  • Spitfires, Hurricanes and WW1 replica aircraft

Hundreds enjoy chance to view maritime history

Flags are out for Woodbridge maritime festival Credit: ITV Anglia
Woodbridge decked out for its Maritime Festival Credit: ITV Anglia

Hundreds of people have been in Woodbridge for the town’s Maritime Festival.

The two day event showcases the importance of the sea and river to the history of the area.

On show are Thames barges and various traditional boats, including three boats originally owned by Arthur Ransome – the author of Swallows and Amazons.

The festival features live music and stalls with local produce, arts and crafts. There is also a 13-metre long replica of the Sutton Hoo burial ship.

  1. Malcolm Robertson

Holiday firms cash in on mild and sunny March

March 2014 has so far been one of the mildest on record and is providing the Anglia region's tourist industry with a massive boost. It followed one of the mildest and sunniest winters.

Across Essex, Norfolk and Suffolk, tourism is worth an estimated £7½ billion a year.

It's an industry that is very dependent on the weather and the recent mild temperatures are encouraging a flurry of bookings and hopes for a bumper year.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Malcolm Robertson from Southwold in Suffolk

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  1. Tanya Mercer

Cambridge challenges expensive city break claim

Holidays and short trips away can be expensive but a new report has found a city break in Cambridge will set you back rather more than most.

The travel website Trip Advisor has released a league table, which claims a night's stay for two in the city is more expensive than London - in fact it's the second most expensive city break in the UK.

Cambridge has hit back insisting the city is good value for money and more than worth it.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Tanya Mercer

Summer getaway begins

The start of the school holidays marks the beginning of the peak summer season for our region's tourism industry.

But with the recent high temperatures, are people choosing to stay at home, rather than go abroad this year?

Serena Sandhu looks now at two families taking very different holidays - home, and away.

Tourism experts say businesses must adapt

Great Yarmouth Credit: Credit: PA

Tourism experts in East Anglia have said that businesses need to prepare for the possibility of more wet summers to come.

Chris Scargill from Larking Gowen said businesses like Banham Zoo and the new model village at Wroxham are good examples as they have invested in indoor attractions, which won't be at the mercy of the British weather.

Twin tigers born at Banham Zoo. Credit: Banham Zoo

He told ITV News Anglia that banks are lending money to business which want to adapt, but the situation is not an easy one. Traditional 'bucket and spade' destinations are most likely to suffer from weather extremes.

He also said that people should look at the day to day forecasts, and not just assume it's all doom and gloom, and that East Anglia still enjoys very dry weather compared to the rest of the UK.

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