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Woman rescued from UEA lake in Norwich is identified

Police say a woman rescued from the lake at the University of East Anglia has been identified.

The woman - who is thought to be in her 40s or 50s - remains in a critical condition in hospital.

She was pulled from the lake at the UEA in Norwich on Wednesday afternoon (October 18).

Police had been appealing for help to work out who she was. The only personal item she had with her was a key.

UEA study shows Twitter can predict the outcome of football matches

Tweets can help predict the outcome of football matches Credit: Stephen Pond/EMPICS Sport

New research by the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows Tweets can help predict the outcome of football matches. The study found the tone of Tweets can show when soccer bets are mispriced.

Researchers examined 13.8 million Tweets during the English Premier League 2013/2014 season. These compared prices generated during matches on gambling site Betfair. They found if the tone of Tweets in any given second was positive then the team was more likely to win than bookies predicted.

The study says Tweets are most helpful after goals and red cards. Researchers think this is because social media is particularly good at analysing new information as it comes in during matches.

Social media is already being used as a forecasting tool by a number of companies and agencies but this study has shown its accuracy.

This is a real 'wisdom of crowds’ kind of outcome. It says that if we listen to the right parts of the crowd, we can gain more information and make better predictions.

– Dr James Reade

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UEA scientists research rainfall in India in hope they can predict monsoons

The underwater robot Credit: University of East Anglia

Scientists in Norwich have travelled to India to help with a project that can predict monsoon rainfall there.

Researchers at the University of East Anglia will be using underwater robots in the Bay of Bengal to monitor how ocean conditions influence the climate.

It's hoped the £8 million project will help forecast the rains more accurately and so reduce any damage caused.

The robot will be used to monitor conditions underwater Credit: University of East Anglia

"The Indian monsoon is notoriously hard to predict. It is a very complicated weather system and the processes are not understood or recorded in science. We will be combining oceanic and atmospheric measurements to monitor weather systems as they are generated. Nobody has ever made observations on this scale during the monsoon season itself so this is a truly ground-breaking project."

– Lead researcher, Prof Adrian Matthews, UEA

The project is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, the Newton Fund, the Indian Ministry of Earth Sciences and the UK's Met Office.

More than a million downloads for pioneering game

More than a million people have downloaded a mobile phone game which is helping researcher's studying dementia.

The project saw Cambridge-based Alzheimer's Research UK team up with scientists from the University of East Anglia, UCL and a telecoms company to develop the game.

Playing the game will help our scientists understand in detail how our brains navigate space. It's reckoned that by playing the game for just 2 minutes generates the same amount of data it would take researchers 5 hours to obtain.

Find out more about the game below.

Mortarboard madness? UEA stops students from throwing hats in graduation tradition

It's either health and safety gone mad or an example of an educational establishment looking after its students responsibly.

Ahead of the graduation season, when students celebrate the awarding of their degrees in the time honoured fashion by throwing their mortar boards into the air, the University of East Anglia has banned the practice.

The UEA says hurling the pointed hats upwards is causing injury.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Natalie Gray.

University says mortarboard ban is for large groups of students

Mortarboards from 'Graduatrion Attire Ltd' Credit: ITV News Anglia

The University of East Anglia which has been criticised by the Health and Safety Executive for stopping its students this year from throwing mortarboards into the air at their graduation ceremonies, says it is only for large groups of students.

The HSE had said the ban was 'over-the-top' and that the chance of being injured by the throwing of mortarboards was 'incredibly small'.

Now the UEA says that small individual groups can go away and photograph themselves throwing the traditional hats, but is 'discouraging' very large groups from carrying out the tradition.

"We're not banning anything, we have a large photograph of about 250 students in their gowns and the last few years we've had a few nasty accidents which has rather spoilt the day for some students and so it's an avoidable accident, so we are discouraging the throwing of hats in the big orchestrated photograph, but people can take their own photographs around the campus if they wish."

– Prof Neil Ward, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of East Anglia

Watch more reaction from the UEA's Neil Ward who is reacting to criticism from the HSE.

The Managing Director of 'Graduation Attire Ltd' in Bedford told ITV News Anglia that there have been people in the past hurt at graduation ceremonies.

Martin Lewis from 'Graduation Attire Ltd in Bedford Credit: ITV News Anglia

"There've been cases in the past where people have been hurt, especially bystanders, perhaps a child in a buggy if it falls on them. Based on that alone it should be stopped. The best solution is probably to improve the hat, you can't cut the corners off but you could make them softer."

– Martin Lewis, Graduation Attire Ltd
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