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Which is the best month to be born in?

New research from the University of Essex has found that children born in certain months of the year are fitter, stronger and more powerful than those born in other months.

Researchers studied 8,000 children and measured their fitness, muscle strength and power.

Published in the International Journal of Sports Medicine, the research found that children born in November were fitter and more powerful than those born at other times, in particular those with birthdays in April, May and June.

October-born children were stronger than those born in all other months except September and November.

University offers free lectures

A new series of free lectures is being launched at the University of Essex to give people the chance to hear from its leading academics.

The Professorial Inaugural Lecture series features leading academics who have recently been appointed as professors.

Each talk will be held at the Lakeside Theatre at the University’s Colchester Campus.

Lectures will cover a broad range of subjects including the nature of modern warfare and the transformation of advertising in the 1950s and 60s.

Admission is free but needs to be booked in advance.

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Scientists seek to unravel how brain sees 3D movies

Film-goers watch a 3D movie Credit: PA

Scientists at the University of Essex are hoping to work out how we see 3D movies.

The researchers have been awarded a £369,000 research grant to get a better idea of how the brain transforms the flat 2D image into a 3D one using the special glasses.

The research could help 3D movie-makers and designers of virtual reality systems make their products as “real” as possible.

3D film audiences experience a vivid awareness of three-dimensional objects and people because the special glasses present two slightly different versions of the movie to the left and right eye.

The three-year research project funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, is to determine how the brain interprets these differences.

Dr Paul Hibbard explained: “We know a 3D understanding is achieved by neurons at the back of the brain responding to the different images from each eye to make a 3D model. What we don’t know, and are trying to understand, is how the neurons are achieving this.”

It could also give a better insight into the binocular image differences that our brains respond to, and how it uses these to determine three-dimensional shape. The research could help the development of artificial computer vision , important for robotic and artificial intelligence systems.

Students get underwater lecture

Marine biology students at the University of Essex have been given lectures 18 metres underwater.

They were taught about the challenges threatening coral reefs off the shore of Indonesia. By using specialised equipment Professor David Smith was able to speak directly to his students underwater for the first time.

View Serena Sandhu's report...

Students sink to new depths for underwater lecture

Marine biology students at the University of Essex have been given lectures 18 meters underwater.

They were taught about the challenges threatening coral reefs off the shore of Indonesia.

By using specialised equipment Professor David Smith was able to speak directly to his students underwater for the first time.

Click below to watch a report by ITV News Anglia's Serena Sandhu:

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Singing star among those to get honorary degrees

Annie Lennox Credit: PA

Annie Lennox is to be awarded with an honorary degree by the University of Essex.

The singer songwriter who found fame with the Eurthymics in the 1980s is to be presented with the award in recognition of her humanitarian work.

Also receiving honorary awards are Hertfordshire's Olympic and world champion cyclist Laura Trott and Sir Keith Mills, from Brentwood, who helped deliver the Olympics.

The degrees will be presented in July.

Are you suffering from FoMO? (Fear of Missing Out)

Researchers have identified the 'fear of missing out' on social media
Researchers have identified the 'fear of missing out' on social media Credit: Press Association

More and more users of social media suffer from a 'Fear of Missing Out' or FoMO for short.

Researchers at the University of Essex say FoMO is a concern people have that others may be having more fun and rewarding experiences than they are.

It's characterised as the desire to stay continually connected with what others are doing.

The researchers have devised a test for people who fear they may be suffering from the effects of FoMO.

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